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TOO MUCH COLONOSCOPY?

A MEDICARE STUDY SUGGESTS COLONOSCOPY IS REPEATED TOO SOON, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Medicare data have shown that many people whove had routine screening colonoscopy to rule out colon cancer have a repeat procedure far sooner than guidelines indicate. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, comments.

NELSON: There is no question at all that colonoscopy at age 50 saves lives. Once a screening colonoscopy is undertaken and there are no abnormal findings, the screening guidelines suggest maybe another screening colonoscopy might be attempted in a decade or so, but if you look at the utilization of colonoscopy, at least half of everybody who had a negative colonoscopy had another one within three to five years, and that is overkill at a time when were trying to control health care costs, that is a procedure that may not necessarily been needed at all.       :35

So if your colonoscopy is normal and you have no symptoms of colon cancer, question anyone who tells you you need another a few years later. At Johns Hopkins, Im Elizabeth Tracey

 

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