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MEASLES VACCINE

COULD AN INHALABLE MEASLES VACCINE IMPROVE WORLDWIDE VACCINATION RATES?†ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Measles remains a killer worldwide, yet making vaccination widely available is stymied by the delicacy of the vaccine and other factors.  Now Diane Griffin and colleagues at Johns Hopkins have shown that an inhalable, dry powder vaccine for measles works well in an animal model.

GRIFFIN: The vaccine that we tested and published recently is a dry powder version of the current measles vaccine, live virus measles vaccine thatís used in much of the world.†The dry powder version is, first of all, itís stable.†The way itís given is through a dry powder inhaler and the vaccine itself is in a little capsule so it also takes up a small volume to ship, itís a single dose so you wouldnít waste any, it wouldnít require any needles and syringes.†      :29

Griffin says this work was funded by the Gates Foundation, but now new funding is needed to scale up vaccine production and distribution throughout the world.†She says deaths due to measles remain in the thousands annually, and some occur even here in the US.†At Johns Hopkins, Iím Elizabeth Tracey.

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