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BAG PSA?

PROSTATE SPECIFIC ANTIGEN TESTING CONTINUES TO BE CONTROVERSIAL, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Prostate specific antigen or PSA testing underpins prostate cancer screening, but the test is increasingly under fire as more studies pan its use. Now a study has shown that PSA velocity, or the rate at which PSA increases, may also be suspect. Ballantine Carter, a prostate cancer expert at Johns Hopkins, says this conclusion must be viewed within the constraints of the study itself.

CARTER: The way patients got into this placebo arm was they had a PSA less than 3, but the most interesting part is that almost fifty percent of them were over seventy. The population really is a population of men who were overdiagnosed, and who less likely had a lethal prostate cancer. So I would conclude that PSA velocity is not very useful in a population of men who are unlikely to have a lethal prostate cancer and is much more useful in younger men in their forties and fifties.      :33

Carter says each man must decide himself whether to have PSA screening. At Johns Hopkins, Iím Elizabeth Tracey.


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