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ASTHMA, ALLERGY AND ROADWAYS

LIVING NEXT TO A BUSY ROADWAY IS HAZARDOUS TO THE HEALTH OF CHILDREN, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Noise and the potential for accidents with vehicles aside, living next to a busy roadway is hazardous to the health of children in another way, Johns Hopkins research led by William Checkley has shown.  Both the chronic lung condition asthma, and allergy, known in medical parlance as atopy, are both risks.

CHECKLEY:  We found that children who lived immediately next to a busy roadway had significantly more asthma and atopy than the children who lived farther away.  The relationship between asthma and busy roadways has been described in other studies.  What is more surprising is we found this new evidence about the allergic origins of asthma in relation to distance from the road.  We found the closer you were to the roadway the more atopy there was.    :29

Checkley says the one bright spot here is that asthma that develops as a result of allergy responds better to treatments such as inhaled steroid medications than asthma with other causes.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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