Johns Hopkins logo

Health Newsfeed

SAFE SHOT


MOST CHILDREN WITH EGG ALLERGIES CAN STILL SAFELY RECEIVE A FLU SHOT, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Flu vaccines are still produced in eggs, rendering the injections a potential problem for those with egg allergy, the majority of whom are children.  But Robert Wood and colleagues at Johns Hopkins have developed a protocol for administering the vaccine that minimizes risk.

WOOD: Flu vaccines all contain some amount of egg protein.  What we’ve done over the last years is develop protocols that have allowed us to give most kids with egg allergy the flu vaccine, even kids with severe egg allergy.  It is done in the allergy clinic by actually doing a skin test with the vaccine to see how allergic the child is to that vaccine.  Based on that skin test result decide on whether it’s safe to administer the vaccine, and right now, we’re able to safely immunize about 95% of kids with egg allergy with the flu shot.            :32

Wood emphasizes that the vaccine should only be given in such a safe setting to children with egg allergy.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


Search Health NewsFeed

-----------------------------------------
Health NewsFeed Home | Hopkins Medicine Home