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SURGERY OR PREGNANCY?

ARE OUTCOMES BETTER AFTER OBESITY SURGERY FOR WOMEN WHO THEN BECOME PREGNANT?  ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Obese women who underwent surgery for obesity and then became pregnant had lower rates of gestational diabetes and fewer cesarean sections, a Johns Hopkins study led by Anne Burke found.  Does this mean obese women considering pregnancy should follow suit?  Burke comments.

BURKE:  If you’re morbidly obese and considering bariatric surgery and considering a pregnancy it may be worthwhile discussing with your doctors about the appropriate timing of the surgery.  I think we have to be cautious though this was a retrospective study.  And so we don’t want to be saying that every woman who is obese needs to go out and have surgery before they have a baby.  But I think what can be said is that women who are morbidly obese who are considering bariatric surgery should discuss with their physicians about whether that would be appropriate to do before they become pregnant.  :27

Burke adds that the definitive study to answer the question of obesity surgery and pregnancy timing would be a prospective study.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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