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PALLIATION

PALLIATIVE CARE MAY HELP IMPROVE MOOD AND SURVIVAL IN PEOPLE WITH CANCER, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

People with a type of lung cancer called non-small cell who were offered palliative care early in the course of their disease experienced less depression and actually lived longer than those who received standard care, a study in the New England Journal of Medicine reports. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says this study underscores the value of palliative care.

NELSON:  Palliative care is becoming an essential component of the care of people with cancer, particularly the people who have life-threatening disease.  The whole goal of medical care is to enrich someone’s life, allow them to be more independent, free of symptoms that limit their lives, and palliative care is a very important tool, often near the end of a course of cancer, that appears to be able to accomplish this.  This article that we’ve heard about suggests that not only are people less depressed, less symptoms, but they may even live longer with well-applied palliative care.   :31

Palliative care centers are opening in many more medical centers nationally.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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