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HEART IMPACT OF CANCER TREATMENT

CHILDREN WHO SURVIVE CHILDHOOD CANCERS MAY BE AT HIGHER RISK FOR HEART PROBLEMS, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Surviving cancer, particularly cancers of childhood, is largely a success story, with more and more people surviving their disease for longer period s of time.  Yet survival too comes with its own set of problems, often the consequences of successful treatment.  A recent study in Annals of Internal Medicine found that about one-fourth of childhood cancer survivors experienced some heart problems.  William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, comments.

NELSON: There are an estimated somewhere between 12 and 16 million cancer survivors not just of childhood cancers but of cancers in adulthood.  Each of these people faces a unique set of health challenges, some of them related to the cancer that they have, might it return, might another cancer arise.  Some of it related to the treatments that they’ve had.  Different treatments have different risks going forward as we’re learning for instance in this study and many others.  My biggest concern is do we have the expertise in our health system to provide these people with the preventive and supportive care that they need going forward.   :35

At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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