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WHY NOT BREATHS?

WHY HAS RESCUE BREATHING BEEN ELIMINATED FROM MOST CPR?  ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Breathing for someone who has experienced a heart attack seems like such a good idea, but has recently been eliminated from the technique of CPR based on studies showing it doesn’t help survival.  Myron Weisfeldt, chief of medicine at Johns Hopkins and a CPR expert, identifies some of the issues.

WEISFELDT: The difficulty with rescue breathing is that you need to clear the airway, position the patient’s head, and their neck and their jaw, in a way that opens the airway so the tongue is not falling back and obstructing the airway and that’s actually a pretty difficult mechanical trick to do.  For sure, there are a lot of people who don’t do CPR because they really don’t want to perform mouth to mouth and that is something that now is behind us we don’t have to worry about that any more.  Because you can get just as good results without doing mouth to mouth in adults.  :35

Compressions, however, are critical. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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