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BREATHING NEEDED

NO BREATHS REQUIRED FOR CPR DOESN’T APPLY TO ALL, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

While the majority of people who experience out of the hospital heart attacks will respond well to CPR using only chest compression, some will still require rescue breathing.  Myron Weisfeldt, chief of medicine at Johns Hopkins and a CPR expert, explains.

WEISFELDT: The one major caveat is that in children where drowning, getting a toy stuck in their mouth, or in their airway, or having severe asthma, is so often the cause of a cardiac arrest that in children we really do need to teach and do rescue breathing as part of an effort to resuscitate people.  :22

Weisfeldt says that since rescue breathing is still a likelihood for some cardiac arrest victims, the incorporation of such breathing into most CPR instruction and certification will remain, particularly for health professionals.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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