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NO MOUTH TO MOUTH

MOUTH TO MOUTH RESUSCITATION ISN’T NEEDED TO HELP MOST HEART ATTACKS VICTIMS, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Mouth to mouth resuscitation or rescue breathing isn’t required to perform CPR effectively on the vast majority of people, two recent studies in the New England Journal of Medicine show.  That’s good news because many people simply can’t remember the ratio of breaths to compressions and don’t try to do CPR at all.  Myron Weisfeldt, chief of medicine at Johns Hopkins and a CPR expert, comments.

WEISFELDT: You don’t have to do what’s called rescue breathing, most of us call it mouth to mouth ventilation, the study shows that your results are just as good if you don’t ventilate.  What’s important is that you compress forcefully and don’t stop.  If you get fatigued find somebody else to take over and keep compressing.  And of course you need to call 911 and get the EMS system there.  :24

Weisfeldt says most EMS personnel are on the scene within eight minutes, and they can begin ventilation then.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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