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NO BREATHS

MOUTH TO MOUTH ISN’T NEEDED FOR MOST CPR, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

The majority of people who experience a heart attack in a place outside of a hospital need chest compression immediately, but mouth to mouth breathing is not necessary, two studies in a recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine conclude.  Myron Weisfeldt, chief of medicine at Johns Hopkins and a CPR expert, says the take home message is clear.

WEISFELDT: What’s important about this is that every American who sees a cardiac arrest victim can do something to improve the chances that they’re going to survive.  No question about it, if a bystander does CPR the survival rate is 20 to 100% increased depending upon the exact population that we’re talking about.  And what this study shows is that all you need to  do as a bystander, in most adults, is to just compress the chest rhythmically and forcefully and you will improve the chance for survival.   :35

Right now only 15 to 30% of bystanders attempt CPR.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


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