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BOYS AND SEX

EVEN THOUGH GUIDELINES HAVE CHANGED, BOYS DON’T GET COUNSELING ABOUT SEXUAL HEALTH, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Boys, even ones who are sexually active and report high risk sexual behaviors, don’t hear messages about sexual health from their healthcare providers, nor are they offered screening,  in spite of changes in national guidelines established more than a decade ago, a Johns Hopkins study led by Arik Marcell has shown

MARCELL: The conversations need to happen in multiple domains, and they’re not necessarily happening in any of them very well.  Particularly for boys.  Mothers tend to be the sexual health communicators.  The types of conversations they have with their sons are of much less detail than they have with daughters.  Schools are not really promoting comprehensive sex education and in clinical settings services have been historically really focused on girls.  We’ve got to figure out a way to improve the communication in all of the settings and to make it socially acceptable for boys to engage in these types of services.    :34

Marcell points out that more boys were asked about sexually transmitted infections in 1995 than in 2002.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

 


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