Johns Hopkins logo

Health Newsfeed

MEDS BEFORE AND AFTER

ANCHOR LEAD:  MANY OLDER PATIENTS EXPERIENCE MEDICATION ERRORS BOTH DURING AND AFTER A HOSPITAL STAY, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

When older people must go to the hospital, many of them don’t receive the right medications they were taking before admission, and even fewer are brought up to speed on medication changes once they’ve been discharged, a recent study found.  Michele Bellantoni, a geriatrics expert at Johns Hopkins, says that not getting medications right on admission can hinder healing.

BELLANTONI: As that older adult is starting to recover in the post acute care inpatient setting, they may well begin to decline because that everyday medicine was missed at the time a person came into the hospital.  And then almost every patient had a change in medicine at the time of discharge, and yet very few had written instructions, about one in ten had written instructions to stop medicines that were taken at home when they were being discharged.     :27

Bellantoni says this study points to the need for a primary care physician to oversee all aspects of a patient’s hospitalization and discharge.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

 


Search Health NewsFeed

-----------------------------------------
Health NewsFeed Home | Hopkins Medicine Home