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SUGAR AND BLOOD PRESSURE

ANCHOR LEAD: A NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT SUGAR-SWEETENED BEVERAGES MAY INCREASE BLOOD PRESSURE, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

You thought salt was the culprit when it came to high blood pressure, right?  Now it turns out that sugar-sweetened beverages also play a role.  Lawrence Appel, senior author of the study published recently in Circulation, explains the finding.

APPEL:  There seems to be a dose response such that with every serving of sugar sweetened beverage blood pressure goes up by one to two millimeters of mercury, so obviously this will have a greater impact on those people who are starting off with three or four beverages per day and then drop down to zero.      :20

The rise in blood pressure was not seen with sugar free versions of the beverages studied.

APPEL: This provides more evidence that we should be cutting back on beverages that basically provide excess calories but provide no nutrients.  We are concerned primarily about weight but now we have evidence that it also might be adversely affecting blood pressure.    :14

Appel says the exact reason sugar-sweetened beverages have an impact on blood pressure isn’t yet known.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

 

 


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