Johns Hopkins logo

Health Newsfeed

VACCINE DOSE

ANCHOR LEAD:  COULD A BETTER IMMUNE REPONSE ALLOW WOMEN TO RECEIVE LOWER VACCINE DOSES?  ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Immune responses to vaccines in women are faster and more robust than in men, a Johns Hopkins literature review led by Sabra Klein concludes.  Does this mean women can receive lower doses?  Klein comments.

KLEIN:  When we’re faced with a potential vaccine shortage and concerns over a vaccine shortage, the way that we were during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, could it be that you could give women a lower dose of a vaccine, they would be as protected as men, potentially experience fewer adverse side effects, and make vaccine available to more individuals within populations.    :23

This robust response may also be the cause of women’s complaints that they feel like they’re getting sick after receiving a vaccine or more severe or persistent soreness at the injection site.  Klein says vaccine developers and healthcare providers need to take these differences into account to encourage women to receive voluntary immunizations.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

 


Search Health NewsFeed

-----------------------------------------
Health NewsFeed Home | Hopkins Medicine Home