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CPR SOLUTION

ANCHOR LEAD: HOW CAN MEDICAL RESIDENTS BE TAUGHT TO PRACTICE CPR BETTER?  ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

An unacceptably high percentage of medical residents in pediatrics at Johns Hopkins failed to initiate CPR when it was clearly necessary, a recent study showed.  Elizabeth Hunt, one of the study’s authors, says this study, done with lifelike simulation models, has also offered up important ways in which teaching the technique should be changed.

HUNT:  One of the things that we were really excited to find was that we were looking for variables associated with time to defibrillation, so what factor led into being faster than someone else?  And what we realized was that those residents who actually had hands on practice, who had actually gotten to discharge the defibrillator themselves, they were 87% faster than those who had never gotten to do all the steps themselves.  And what we then realized was that our course shows you how to do it but they don’t always make you do it yourself.             :27

Hunt says the defibrillators in the hospital are considerably more complex than those in public places like airports and shopping malls, so actually operating them is critical.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


-- JHMI --

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