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WEIGHT AND INCONTINENCE

ANCHOR LEAD: MANAGING URINARY INCONTINENCE MAY BE AS SIMPLE AS LOSING WEIGHT, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Modest weight loss in overweight and obese women improved urinary incontinence, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine reported.  Arthur Burnett, a urologist at Johns Hopkins, says such a solution avoids surgery and other options, and may help other health issues as well.

BURNETT:  I do think that trying to lose weight in those who are significantly overweight possibly conferring benefit with regard to urinary incontinence is worthwhile.  It’s interesting to think about how we live that influences our overall health.  When we think about the issue of overweight and obesity being a factor for many health conditions and now we’re thinking about maybe this has some risk with what we may have previously thought was just other factors involved with the pelvic floor leading to incontinence.  But this is something that we may be responsible for that may be correctable.    :29

Women who lost modest amounts of weight in the study experienced a benefit with regard to urinary incontinence, so Burnett thinks such a strategy should be quite practical.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.


-- JHMI --

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