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McDevitt, Michael, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Oncology

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410-614-0167


Dr. Michael A. McDevitt














Clinical/Academic Interests
My clinical interests are in the evaluation of anemias, thrombocytopenias, and general benign  hematology.

Research Interests
Our laboratory program explores three major areas:

  • Identification and characterization of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 7 that contribute to the pathogenesis of the myeloid malignancies.

  • Investigating the transcriptional regulation of hematopoiesis in normal and disease states with a particular focus on the GATA-1 transcription factor and the megakaryocytic lineage.

  • Characterization of the role of inflammatory cytokines in the severe anemia associated with malaria infection.
Education:

1982

BA, Chemistry,Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

1988

Ph.D., Molecular Cell Biology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY

1989

M.D., Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY

  

Postdoctoral Training

1989 – 1992

Internship and Residency, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Hospital, Baltimore, MD

1992 – 1998

Clinical and Research Fellowship in Hematology and Oncology, Harvard School of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, The Children's Hospital (research), Boston, MA




  

 

Academic Positions

1998 – 1999 

Instructor in Medicine, Harvard School of Medicine, The Brigham and Women's Hospital, The Dana Farber Cancer Institute

1999 – 2001

Assistant Professor and Director, Department of Experimental Hematology, The Picower Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY

2002 

Assistant Investigator and Director, Department of Experimental Hematology, The Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, The North Shore - LIJ Research Institute, Manhasset, NY

2002 – Present 

Assistant Professor, Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

2004-Present

Assistant Professor, Division of Hematological Malignancy, Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

  

   


Selected Publications

  • McDevitt MA, Imperiale MJ, Ali H, Nevins JR. Requirement of a downstream sequence for generation of a poly (A) addition site. Cell. 1984; 37:993-9.

  • Hart RP, McDevitt MA, Nevins JR. Poly(A) site cleavage in a HeLa nuclear extract is dependent on downstream sequences. Cell. 1985. 1985; 43:677-83.

  • McDevitt MA, Gilmartin GM, Nevins JR. Multiple factors are required for poly(A) addition to a mRNA 3' end. Genes Dev. 1988; 2:588-97.

  • Shivdasani RA, Fujiwara Y*, McDevitt MA*, Orkin SH, A lineage-selective knock-out establishes the critical role of transcription factor GATA-1 in megakaryocyte growth and platelet development. EMBO J.1997; 13:3965-3973.

  • McDevitt MA, Fujiwara Y, Shivdasani RA, Yang H, Orkin SH, A "knockdown" mutation created by cis-element gene targeting reveals the dependence of erythroid cell maturation on the level of transcription factor GATA-1. PNAS. 1997; 94:6781-6785.

  • McDevitt MA, Fujiwara Y, Shivdasani RA, Orkin SH, An upstream, DNase I hypersensitive region of the hematopoietic-expressed transcription factor GATA-1 gene confers developmental specificity in transgenic mice. PNAS. 1997; 94:7976-7981.

  • Orkin SH, Shivdasani RA, Fujiwara Y, McDevitt MA, Transcription factor GATA-1 in megakaryocyte development. Stem Cells. 1998; 16(suppl 2): 79-83.

  • Vyas P.*, McDevitt M.A.*, Cantor A., Katz S., Fujiwara Y., Orkin S.H., Different sequence requirements for expression in erythroid and megakaryocytic cells within a regulatory element upstream of the GATA-1 gene. Development. 1999; 126(12): 2799-2811. (* equal contributors)

  • Wechsler J., Greene M., McDevitt M.A., Anastasi J., Karp J., LeBeau M., Crispino J.D., Acquired mutations in GATA-1 in the megakaryoblastic leukemia of Down syndrome. Nature Genetics.
    2002; 32(1):148-52.

  • Greene ME, Mundschau G, Wechsler J, McDevitt M, Gamis A, Karp J, Gurbuxani S, Arceci R, Crispino JD., Mutations in GATA1 in both transient myeloproliferative disorder and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia of Down syndrome., Blood Cells Mol Dis., 2003; 31(3): 351-6.

  • Yee AS, K*. Paulson KE*, McDevitt MA*, Berasi SP, Kim J, Huang CY, Zhang X, Unlikely Partners: the HBP1 Transcriptional Repressor and the p38 MAP Kinase in G1 Regulation and Tumor Suppression, GENE, 2004 Jul 7;336(1):1-13.

  • McDevitt MA, Xie J, Gordeuk V, and Richard Bucala, The Anemia of Malaria Infection- The Role
    of Inflammatory Cytokines,
    Curr Hematol Rep. 2004 Mar;3(2):97-106. Review.

  • Elagib K., Xiao M., Hussaini I., Delehanty L., Palmer L., Racke F., Birrer M., Shanmugusaram S., McDevitt M.A., Goldfarb A.N. Jun blockade of erythropoiesis: A role for repression of GATA-1 by HERP2. Molecular Cell Biology. 2004; Sept;24(17):7779-94

  • Osthus R.O., Karim B., Prescott J., Smith B.D. McDevitt M.A., Huso D., Dang C.V. The myc target gene JPO1/CDCA7 is frequently overexpressed in human tumors and has limited transforming activity in vivo. In press. Cancer Research.
  • McDevitt MA, Xie J, Shanmugasundaram G, Griffith J, Liu A, McDonald C, Thuma P, Gordeuk VR, Metz CN, Mitchell R, Keefer J, David J, Leng L, Bucala R., A critical role for the host mediator macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the pathogenesis of malarial anemia., J Exp Med.2006 May 15;203(5):1185-96.

  • Zhang X, Kim J, Ruthazer R, McDevitt MA, Wazer DE, Paulson KE, Yee AS., The HBP1 transcriptional repressor participates in RAS-induced premature senescence, Mol Cell Biol. 2006 Nov;26(22):8252-66.

  • McDevitt, MA, Condon, M, Stamberg J., Karp JE., and McDiarmid, M:Fluorescent in-situe Hybridization (FISH) in Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood of Leukemia Patients: Implications for Occupational Surveillance, 2007, in press.

 

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