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The hearing aid industry has made significant advancements in correcting hearing loss, including the cosmetic impact of hearing aids and technology
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Hearing Aids

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» Caring for Hearing Aids
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» Troubleshooting
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» FAQs
    

To schedule an appointment for a hearing aid evaluation or to purchase hearing protection devices, call 443-997-6467.

Hopkins Hearing > Hearing Aids > Troubleshooting
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Troubleshooting

If your hearing aid is not working properly, there are a few things you can troubleshoot on your own.

  • Check to make sure you have a fresh battery in your device. Replace the battery as needed.
  • The most common reason for a hearing aid to sound weak or dead is that it is clogged with wax or debris. If your hearing aid has a wax guard, you should replace the wax guard with a clean one. If you have a cleaning tool (brush or pick), you would want to perform the cleaning of both the microphone and receiver (speaker). Learn more about caring for your hearing aid.
  • Did the device get wet? Is there moisture visible in the tubing of a behind-the-ear model? Is there corrosion present in the battery door compartment? If moisture is a possible concern, put the device in your hearing aid dehumidifier or drying kit.
  • Your hearing aid is whistling or feeding back. You want to make sure the device is properly inserted into your ear canal. If it is still making feedback, you may have a blockage of wax or debris in your ear canal. Or the device may not be fitting properly.
  • The hearing aid is slipping out of your ear. You may have moisture in your ear canal causing the device to move around. Or the hearing aid may be changing position from jaw movement when you are talking or chewing.
  • Your hearing aid is hurting or uncomfortable in your ear. You want to make sure it is properly inserted into the ear. You may also need to check for wax buildup in the ear canal. If the discomfort persists, you may need the hearing aid shell to be modified or remade for a better fit.
  • Has your hearing changed?

If your hearing aid is still not performing properly, you may either need to schedule an appointment with the audiologist or drop the device off with the medical office coordinators. Your audiologist may be able to repair the hearing aid in the office or it may need to be sent to the manufacturer for repair. In the event the hearing aid is not fitting well, a new earmold impression may be taken and the device would be sent to the company to be remade.

If your hearing aid appears to be functioning, the audiologist will check to make sure you do not have a blockage in your ear canal. If your ears are clear, then the audiologist may check your hearing to determine if there has been a change. In the event there has been a decrease in hearing, it is likely that your hearing aid may be reprogrammed for your current hearing loss. Your audiologist will be able to determine the best course of action for you.

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