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Audiologist

Audiologist

What is an audiologist?

Clinical audiologists are health care professionals who measure and evaluate a person's ability to hear sounds, and specialize in the treatment of people with hearing disorders. Audiologists often study and provide guidance for people on the following topics:

  • How language is learned and spoken

  • The anatomy of the human ear, brain, and nerves

  • Causes of hearing loss

  • Aural rehabilitation (this involves techniques for the hearing impaired to improve speaking and communication)

  • The use of hearing aids

  • Lip reading and sign language techniques

Audiologists conduct hearing exams, test for middle ear disease, treat people with balance problems, and fit hearing aids. Audiologists may practice in a variety of settings, including the following:

  • Hospitals

  • Inpatient rehabilitation centers

  • Long-term care facilities

  • Home health settings

  • Schools

  • Private practice

  • State and federal government agencies

  • Community clinics (these include community hearing and speech centers)

  • Colleges and universities 

Many audiologists hold a master's degree and some hold a clinical doctorate degree in audiology. Audiologists are certified nationally through the American Speech Language Hearing Association (Certificate of Clinical Competence - Audiology, or CCC-A) or the American Board of Audiology (ABA).

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