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Gynecology & Obstetrics

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Conditions We Treat: Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer affects the cervix — the narrow lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Most cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV. When found early, cervical cancer is highly treatable.

Cervical Cancer: What You Need to Know

Woman reading on the computer
  • An HPV infection can cause the cells of the cervix to change and grow, a precancerous condition known as cervical dysplasia.
  • If left untreated, cervical dysplasia can cause cervical cancer.
  • In the U.S., close to 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year.

Patient Resources

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Why choose Johns Hopkins for treatment of cervical cancer?

gynecologic oncology team members

Our Physicians

Rely on the expertise of our physicians to treat your cervical cancer.

a radiologist stands in front of an MRI

Our Surgical Expertise

Johns Hopkins is one of only a few centers performing minimally invasive surgery with sentinel lymph node mapping. This groundbreaking technique uses infrared fluorescent imaging to identify potentially cancerous lymph nodes that would otherwise go undetected. This helps stops the spread of the cancer and reduces recurrence.

Watch this video to learn more about minimally invasive surgery at Johns Hopkins.

cervical cancer doctors

Our Research

Johns Hopkins is a member of the Specialized Program of Research Excellence for cervical cancer and a recipient of a multimillion-dollar grant from the National Cancer Institute. Our researchers are conducting trials for therapeutic vaccines to treat women with HPV-associated precancerous lesions and invasive cancer.

Meet our researchers and learn more about their work. 

Ashley, a former gynecologic oncology patient, and her son sitting in a chair.

Our Patient Care

We believe in treating the whole patient — body, mind and spirit. “We are by your side every step of the way — whether you are just beginning treatment or have completed treatment and are undergoing survivorship care.” – Amanda Fader, M.D. 

Discover how Ashley was treated for cervical cancer while pregnant