Skip Navigation
 
 
 
 
 
Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

Multimorbidity

Forty-eight percent of older adults have three or more chronic conditions, and the number of older adults with multiple chronic conditions will continue to increase dramatically. Multimorbidity independently predicts adverse outcomes, including quality of life, mortality, disability, and complications of treatment beyond the effects of the individual conditions. Currently, there is a significant gap in our understanding of how best to provide care for patients with multimorbidity.

Research focus

In recent work, Johns Hopkins researchers, led by Dr. Cynthia Boyd, have shown that implementing multiple single-disease clinical practice guidelines in older adults with multimorbidity may result in polypharmacy and nonadherence, both of which detrimentally influence patient safety and clinical outcomes. Additional work has demonstrated how the entire process of clinical practice guideline development will need to be modified in order to develop appropriate clinical practice guidelines for patients with multimorbidity.

Current research studies

  • Treatment burden in multimorbidity
  • Development of clinical practice guidelines for patients with multimorbidity
  • Clinical preventive services for patients with multimorbidity
  • Patterns of multimorbidity
  • Performance measurement for patients with multiple chronic conditions
  • Methodological approaches to assess the balance of benefits and harms

For more information please click on this link:  

http://www.americangeriatrics.org/health_care_professionals/clinical_practice/multimorbidity

Collaborators

John Bridges, PhD
Sydney Dy, MD, MSc
David Kent
Milo Puhan, MD, PhD
Cynthia Rand, PhD
Jodi Segal, MD, MPH
Sonal Singh, MD, MPH
Tom Trikalinos
Katrin Uhlig, MD, MS
Ravi Varadhan, PhD
Carlos Weiss
Jennifer Wolff, PhD
Qian-li Xue, PhD

Faculty investigators

Cynthia Boyd, MD, MPH
Bruce Leff, MD
Matthew McNabney, MD

Fellow

Erin Giovannetti

 

#1 in Geriatrics in the U.S.

US News and World Report Best HospitalsThe Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked #1 in the nation in 2013 and is the only hospital in history to be ranked #1 for 21 years in a row by U.S. News & World Report.

 

Refer a Patient

To refer a patient for a geriatric care consultation, please contact us at 410-550-0925.

 

Health Tips for Older Adults

Watch videos of Dr. Arbaje providing health tips as seen on ABC 2 News.

 

Traveling for care?

blue suitcase

Whether crossing the country or the globe, we make it easy to access world-class care at Johns Hopkins.

U.S. 1-410-464-6713 (toll free)
International +1-410-614-6424

 

 
 
 
 
 

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer