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Wilmer Debut

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From left: Clarice Smith, Morton Goldberg, M.D., Bob Smith, Ed Miller, M.D., Rick Forsythe, Ron Peterson, Sandy Forsythe, Willard Hackerman, Lillian Hackerman and Peter McDonnell, M.D.
From left: Clarice Smith, Morton Goldberg, M.D., Bob Smith, Ed Miller, M.D., Rick Forsythe, Ron Peterson, Sandy Forsythe, Willard Hackerman, Lillian Hackerman and Peter McDonnell, M.D.

When the ribbon was cut on the new, $105 million Robert H. and Clarice Smith Building last month, it ushered in a new era for the Wilmer Eye Institute. The 207,000-square-foot building has “six of the most modern ophthalmic operating rooms in the world,” according to Wilmer Director Peter McDonnell, which will allow surgeons to perform 50 percent more procedures each day. There also are five floors dedicated to research, more than doubling the space for what is already the largest eye-related research program in the country.

The building, designed by Ayers Saint Gross of Baltimore, is situated on Broadway and Orleans Street. The research entrance is angled precisely toward the historic Wilmer dome, reflecting the 1889 structure in the facility’s modern windows.

Inside, there are works by noted artists who are former Wilmer patients. A 36-foot, six-ton sculpture made from polished stainless steel was a gift from American sculptor John Safer. New York landscape artist Wolf Kahn has offered 16 of his paintings on extended loan to brighten the surgical waiting area.

The Smith Building will be open to patients next month. The dedication, set to coincide with the 80th anniversary of Wilmer’s first dedication, will take place on Oct. 16. The building is the first facility to be finished under Hopkins’ medical campus expansion project, scheduled for completion in 2011.

–Staff Report

 

 

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