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Most Published

According to Science Watch, the Thomson Scientific newsletter that reports on trends and performance in basic research, Johns Hopkins ranks among the world’s most cited institutions in five of 11 main fields of science: molecular biology/genetics, biology and biochemistry, clinical medicine, neurosciences and space science. Based on papers published in Thomson-indexed journals between 1999 and 2003, the tallies appear in the May/June issue of Science Watch.


Author, Author

Three new books by three Hopkins employees, all available on amazon.com, share the goal of helping people understand and prevent disease:

  • The Complete Diabetes Prevention Plan: A Guide to Understanding the Emerging Epidemic of Prediabetes and Halting Its Progression to Diabetes, by Christopher Saudek, director of the John Hopkins Diabetes Center, with dietitian Sandra Woodruff, explains prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed. The book describes the stages of diabetes and how the disease can be reversed and includes dietary guidelines, weight-loss tips, and 150 easy recipes.
  • Coping with Kidney Disease: A 12-Step Treatment Program to Help You Avoid Dialysis, by Mackenzie Walser, professor of medicine, pharmacology and molecular sciences, and writer Betsy Thorpe, outlines successful strategies for managing kidney disease. The program calls for a supplemented low-protein diet supported by treatments to control blood pressure and correct high cholesterol. For many of Walser’s patients, the plan slowed or even arrested progression of kidney failure.
  • Beyond the Lingo: Working Through Recovery Concepts; A Guide to Addicted Persons and Their Families by addiction counselor Devon Blackwood provides practical solutions to overcome the barriers and traps of dependency. Blackwood draws on more than 15 years of counseling adults, adolescents and their families.

 

Food 24/7

Appetites, like Hopkins Hospital, operate 24/7. But until now, there was no place to grab a bite on campus—other than at vending machines—when the munchies hit at 2:30 a.m. At last, the Espress Oasis Café, in the main hospital cafeteria, is experimenting with expanded service hours. Sandwiches, pastries and beverages will be served round the clock, as long as demand remains strong.

Two new East Baltimore campus eateries include the JHOC Coffee Bar Ice Cream Cart, on JHOC’s upper level courtyard, next to the 601 Grille, open weekdays, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and, for lunch alfresco, the School of Medicine’s new Plaza Café, in Turner Plaza (between the Broadway and Ross Research buildings). By 10 a.m. each day, the café, run by The Daily Grind, raises a green or red flag to let you know if weather permits opening. On the menu: smoothies, iced tea, lemonade, bottled water, sandwiches and salads. It’s open Monday thru Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.—but only when the green flag flies.

 

 

 

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