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Christ Statue

In regard to the recent discussion [Letters, February], it is important not to forget Johns Hopkins’ charge to the original trustees in a letter dated March 10, 1873: “It is my especial request that the influences of religion shall be felt in and impressed upon the whole management of the Hospital; but I desire, nevertheless, that the administration of the charity shall be undisturbed by sectarian influence, discipline or control.”

John W. Payne, M.D.
Associate professor,
Wilmer Institute

Sharon Praissman’s letter [February] carries some truth but lacks some perspective. The Christ statue has more historical significance and sense of healing for some than mere offence felt by a few. Just like all the Johns Hopkins institutions, the statue opens its hands and greets every physician, nurse, employee and patient who passes through that door, irrespective of race, creed and religion. Secondly, if one is annoyed by the statue because of its religious symbolism only, one would also have a problem driving around town, passing by every church, mosque, synagogue or Hindu temple. That would amount to simple paranoia.

Daniel G. Woldeab, R.N.
Nelson 6
Moore Clinic

Moore Clinic

Thank you so much for the article on the 20th year of the Moore Clinic [December]. Friday [Jan. 30] was the [anniversary] celebration at the Museum of

Industry. What a wonderful evening it was, honoring and reflecting on “20 Years of Progress.” I had a memorable time, seeing old friends and then a film with interviews and remembrances. Hopkins, and its incredibly dedicated staff, deserve so much credit. The memories are all life-affirming!

Kathleen Polk
Baltimore

 

 

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