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For the Community

Here are some ways that we're working improve health outcomes for Baltimore residents and expose area students to careers in health care and business.

Specialty care for the underinsured

Launched in 2009, The Access Partnership links uninsured and underinsured East Baltimore residents with specialty care at Johns Hopkins clinics. Eligible residents pay a nominal fee for a referral and get no bills after that. Read more here.

Charity care and other community outreach

Every year, the four hospitals within the Johns Hopkins Health System provide millions of dollars in uncompensated care to patients who can't afford to pay their bills. We also take part in numerous outreach efforts, such as medical education and screenings,community redevelopment efforts and volunteering. In the 2009 fiscal year, our hospitals provided more than $71 million in charity care and had a total community benefit of more than $230 million.  Read more about the Community Benefits Report.

Public school partnerships

Several programs expose Baltimore public school students to the worlds of medicine, research and business experiences that could lead to careers in these fields. Some examples:

  • Each summer, Hopkins Hospital hires about 120 high school students for jobs across campus.
  • Since 2006 city high school students have worked in Hopkins clinics and research labs as part of a paid internship program organized by Justin McArthur and Dana Boatman, professors of neurology.
  • The long-running Dunbar High School/Hopkins Partnership increases students? awareness of health care professions through mentoring, internships, job shadowing, lectures and other activities.
  • A youth mentoring project, BOND TO BOND, fosters connections between city students and Hopkins Hospital professionals.

Clinical trials recruitment

Hopkins recruiters are working closely with the Baltimore community to recruit more members of underrepresented groups into clinical trials. Having a diverse group of trials participants can ensure that study results are representative of the general population, and it can help investigate the reasons why certain groups are disproportionately affected by certain diseases. Read more here.

Community cancer screenings

Since 2001, Hopkins has screened low-income residents of Baltimore City for breast, oral, prostate and cervical cancers. In recent years Hopkins has begun a free colon cancer screening program for residents.

Serving the Hispanic community

A growing roster of clinicians in Hopkins Medicine is reaching out to help Baltimore's Hispanic immigrant families lead healthier lives--for instance, by providing affordable primary care. Read the related story.

What we are doing:

Diversity & Inclusion Stories

Down But Not Out

"Down But Not Out"

Hopkins opens employment doors for the homeless.




Diversity & Inclusion Stories

Diversity Scholars

"Diversity Scholars"

Board of Advisors Scholars are rewarded four-year scholarships that aim to increase diversity in the student body.



 
 
 
 
 

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