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Kristen L. Nelson, MD

Assistant Professor
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Bloomberg Children's Center 6349F
1800 Orleans Street
Baltimore, MD, 21287
Phone: 410-955-5142
E-mail: knelso23@jhmi.edu
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Dr. Kristen Nelson is an assistant professor who is board certified in Pediatrics and board eligible in Pediatric Critical Care. She completed her pediatric ICU training in 2007 and specializes in pediatric critical care. She is Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Office for Pediatric Education (HOPE), which is responsible for education of healthcare professionals in Pediatric Advanced Life Support. Her research interests include the use of medical simulation to improve resident and nurse resuscitation skills and patient safety, the role of human factors in cardiopulmonary arrest management, and methods to improve healthcare multidisciplinary team communication.

Professional Activities

Member, Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society
Member, American Academy of Pediatrics
Member, Society of Critical Care Medicine
Member, Society for Simulation in Healthcare
Member, Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Advisory Committee, Johns Hopkins Hospital
Professional Member, American Heart Association
Co-Director, Hopkins Outreach for Pediatric Education (HOPE) Office
Chair, Pediatric Special Interest Group, Society for Simulation in Healthcare

Selected Publications

  1. Nelson KL, Mills W, Umbel S, Crosson J, Shaffner DH, Hunt EA. Lightning, sudden cardiac death, simulation and an automated external defibrillator: the perfect storm. Resuscitation 74(3):567–71, 2007.
  2. Hunt EA, Shilkofski NA, Stavroudis T, Nelson KL. Simulation: translation to improved team performance. Anesthesiol Clin 25:301–19, 2007.
  3. Shilkofski NA, Nelson KL, Vera K, Hunt EA. Recognition and treatment of unstable supraventricular tachycardia by pediatric residents in a simulation scenario. Sim Healthcare 3(1):4–9,2008.
  4. Nelson KL, Shilkofski NA, Haggerty JA, Saliski M, Hunt EA. The use of cognitive aids during simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrests. Sim Healthcare 3(3):138–45, 2008.
  5. Schwartz JM, Nelson KL, Saliski M, Hunt EA, Pronovost PJ. The daily goals communication sheet: a simple and novel tool for improved communication and care. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf 34(10): 608–13, 2008.

Laboratory Members/Key Associates/Research Collaborators

  • Elizabeth A. Hunt, MD, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, Pediatric Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and Director of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center
  • Nicole A. Shilkofksi, MD, Assistant Professor, Pediatric Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
  • Jamie M. Schwartz, MD, Assistant Professor, Pediatric Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and Director of the Pediatric Transport Team
  • Mary T. Saliski, MSN, CPNP, Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
  • Jamie A. Haggerty, Simulation Specialist, the Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center

Honors

  • 1998 Maggie Duncan Scholarship Award of Southern Pediatric Neurology Society
  • 1999 Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society
  • 1999 Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarship
  • 2000 American Medical Women’s Association Janet M. Glasgow Memorial Achievement Citation
  • 2000-2001 Best Intern of the Year, Aesculapian Society
  • 2002-2003 Best Resident of the Year, Aesculapian Society
  • 2002-2003 Penny Scurto Outstanding Pediatric Resident Award
  • 2002-2003 Outstanding Teaching Resident of the Year
  • 2002-2003 Best PICU Resident (chosen by staff, nurses and respiratory therapists)
  • 2002 SAFMR/SSCI Outstanding Trainee Award
  • 2003 SAFMR/SSCI Outstanding Trainee Award
  • 2006 Third Place, Best Abstract, Patient Safety, “The Use of a Cognitive Aid During Simulated Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrests: An Observation of 60 mock codes.” 6th Annual International Meeting on Medical Simulation
  • 2007 First Place, Best Trainee Abstract Award Winner, “Cognitive Aids Do Not Prompt Initiation of Simulated Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.” 7th Annual International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare Care
 
 
 
 
 
 

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