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AWARDS/HONORS, Jan. 2006-Dec.2007

2007

  • "Consumer Choice" Award goes to The Johns Hopkins Hospital for the 12th Consectutive Year
    For the 12th straight year, National Research Corporation has given The Johns Hopkins Hospital its Consumer Choice Award for the Baltimore region. The award is based on ratings from Maryland health care consumers, who named Johns Hopkins the top quality hospital in the Baltimore area.

  • Radiology Gets Top Honors
    In 2007, Johns Hopkins’ Department of Radiology and Radiological Science was ranked the nation’s best by 600 readers of Medical Imaging Magazine in its second survey of the field. In addition, Elliot Fishman, a Hopkins professor of radiology and oncology, was ranked the top U.S. radiologist. Several other Hopkins radiologists were recognized as being among the best in their subspecialties.

Jan. 2006 - Dec. 2006    

  • For the 16th consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report’s annual ranking of American hospitals places The Johns Hopkins Hospital No. 1 in the nation. In 2006, the hospital ranked first in five of the 16 ranked medical specialties and in the top four in 10 others. The Hospital ranked first in ear, nose and throat, gynecology, kidney disease, urology and rheumatology. It ranked second in neurology/neurosurgery, ophthalmology and psychiatry; third in cancer, digestive disorders, endocrinology, heart/heart surgery, respiratory disorders and pediatrics, and fourth in orthopedics. It ranked 17th in rehabilitation medicine.
     
  • The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is ranked one of the top two medical schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.
     
  • For the 14th straight year, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine ranks as the top recipient of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research dollars.
     
  • For 11 straight years, Hopkins Hospital receives the Consumer Choice Award for the Baltimore region from the National Research Corporation.  Hopkins also ranks No. 1 among consumers in the Bethesda and Hagerstown regions.  It is one of only a few hospitals nationwide to earn top-choice status in a multi-region market.
     
  • Wilmer Eye Institute is named best overall ophthalmology program in the country by Ophthalmology Times for 11 straight years.
     
  • The Johns Hopkins Hospital is named to the first Leapfrog Top Hospitals list of institutions that have made significant strides toward patient safety and hospital quality. Hopkins is one of 59 hospitals honored out of 1,263 surveyed by The Leapfrog Group, a voluntary organization of companies, founded by the Business Roundtable, that mobilizes employer purchasing power to promote and encourage health care safety, quality and customer value.
     
  • The Johns Hopkins Children’s Center is named Baltimore’s regional pediatric burn center by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). The Children’s Center will treat all burn victims under the age of 15 in Maryland and surrounding regions, while Hopkins Bayview will remain the state-designated burn center for adults.
     
  • A research team headed by Bert Vogelstein and Kenneth Kinzler at the Kimmel Cancer Center is one of six in the nation to share a $20 million gift from the Ludwig Fund. Some of the gift will support the newly-formed Ludwig Center at Hopkins, which like the fund is named for the late shipping tycoon Daniel K. Ludwig.
     
  • Researchers Stephen Baylin, professor of oncology and associate director of the Cancer Center for Research; James Herman, associate professor of oncology; and Kornel Schuebel, research associate in the Kimmel Cancer Center, are selected by the National Institutes of Health to collaborate with researchers at the University of Southern California on a three-year, $11.7 million grant that is part of the nationwide, $100 million Cancer Genome project.
     
  • Five Kimmel Cancer Center researchers are dubbed “doctors of the decade” by Science Watch, a newsletter published by Thomson Scientific. With more than 90,000 references among them in the scientific papers of other investigators, Stephen Baylin, James Herman, Kevin Kinzler, David Sidransky and Bert Vogelstein were the most frequently cited cancer researchers from 1999-2005.
     
  • The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Services  receives multiple recognitions of excellence in the first annual “Best of the Best” citations in Medical Imaging magazine, including being named among the nation’s top five radiology departments within a hospital.
     
  • The Johns Hopkins Health System and its president, Ronald R. Peterson, receive the Bridging the Gap Award from the Greater Baltimore Committee for the system’s efforts to strengthen minority businesses in the area.
     
  • The American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists bestows its Best Practice Award on a team of Johns Hopkins pharmacists and nurses from the Children’s Medical and Surgical Center. The team of Judith Ascenzi, John S. Clark, Christopher U. Lehmann, Carol Martlin, Mary W. Taylor and Michael Veltri completely re-designed procedures for prescribing, dispensing and administering continuous infusion medications, significantly enhancing patient safety.
     
  • Three Hopkins Medicine faculty members are named to 2006’s “Top 100 Women” list in The Daily Record, Baltimore’s legal and business newspaper. Garnering the honor are Julie A. Freischlag, professor and director of the Department of Surgery; Toby Gordon, associate professor of surgery and vice president for strategic planning and market research; and Martha N. Hill, Dean of the School of Nursing.
     
  • Baltimore’s Daily Record designates as “Innovators of the Year” Philip A. Cole, E.K. Marshall and Thomas H. Maven Professor and director of the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Science; Mingzhao Xing, assistant professor of medicine; and Pamela L. Zeitlin, professor and director of the Department of Pediatrics – Pulmonary.
     
  • Johns Hopkins’ Community Programs and Research Group, led by Jean Ford, associate professor of oncology and epidemiology, receives a four-year, $5.4 million grant from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The grant will fund a clinical trial to determine if a nurse-led team of community health workers can help remove the barriers faced by minority Medicare recipients in obtaining cancer screening and treatment.
     
  • The Office of Marketing and Communications receives a wide variety of awards from the Association of American Medical Colleges. The Award of Excellence in Electronic Communications goes to Joan Levy and Glenn Simmons for launching the new Electronic Billboard system of in-house communications at the Hopkins Hospital. Writer Judith Minkove receives an Award of Distinction for her February 2005 article, “Superman, M.D.,” about tetraplegic physician S.B. Lee, chief resident in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. The office also is cited in the Premier Performance Integrated Advancement category for its patient safety initiative; and in the Special Projects, Programs and Campaigns category for the Johns Hopkins Medicine “Imagine” advertising campaign.
     
  • The Office of Communications & Public Affairs at Hopkins Bayview receives first place honors for media placement in the Maryland Society for Healthcare Strategy and Market Development’s Alfred Knight Awards competition. The recognition is earned by the media coverage the office obtained for the Phoenix Society’s World Burn Congress, held in Baltimore in the summer of 2005.
     
  • The Community Care-A-Van, a mobile health unit staffed by Hopkins Bayview health care professionals, receives a 2006 Child Health Promotion Award from the Maryland Childhood Immunization Partnership. The award goes to health centers that make extraordinary contributions in the fight against vaccine-preventable disease.
     
  • Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Science, is the co-recipient of the 2006 Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. Greider shares the award and its $100,000 cash prize with Elizabeth H. Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco, and Jack Szostak of the Harvard Medical School. The three are honored for their discovery of telomerase, the enzyme that maintains chromosomal integrity, and their recognition of its importance in aging, cancer and stem cell biology. Greider and Blackburn also share the 2006 Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences for their work on telomeres, the structure of chromosome ends. They are the first women to receive the prize, which includes a $25,000 grant.
     
  • The National Academy of Sciences elects three Hopkins faculty members to join 17 of their Hopkins colleagues in the Academy. The new members are Robert Blum, the William H. Gates Sr. Professor and chair of the Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health; Chi Van Dang, the Johns Hopkins Family Professor in Oncology Research and vice dean for research in the School of Medicine; and Scott Zeger, the Frank Hurley and Catharine Dorrier Professor in Biostatistics and chair of the Bloomberg School’s Department of Biostatistics.
     
  • The American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest scientific society and publisher of the journal, Science, elects Hugh Wolfgang Moser, university professor of neurology and pediatrics, Kenrad Nelson, professor of epidemiology, and Bert Vogelstein, professor of oncology and pathology, as fellows.
     
  • David B. Hellmann, vice dean and director of the Department of Medicine at Hopkins Bayview, is named Distinguished Teacher of the year by the American College of Physicians.
     
  • Ben Carson, director of pediatric neurosurgery, receives the prestigious Spingarn Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Previous recipients of the medal, created in 1915 to recognize distinguished achievement and merit among African Americans, have included Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Colin Powell, Duke Ellington and Oprah Winfrey, among others.
     
  • Marilyn Albert, professor of neurology, receives the 2006 Ronald and Nancy Reagan Research Institute Award in recognition of her outstanding contributions to Alzheimer’s research.
     
  • Deborah Armstrong, associate professor of oncology, gynecology and obstetrics at the Kimmel Cancer Center, is awarded the first annual “Health Breakthrough Award” by the Ladies’ Home Journal for her research on delivering chemotherapy through a catheter directly into the abdomens of ovarian cancer patients, a technique that can increase the survival rate by 16 months or more in women with advanced ovarian cancer.
     
  • Daniel Ashby, director of pharmacy, is appointed to the Accreditation Council of the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education for a three-year term. He also is named Distinguished Alumnus by Wayne State University’s Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Science.
     
  • Lora G. Bankova, a research postdoctoral fellow in the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, receives the Skin Diseases Research Award for 2006 from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The award provides $25,000 to fund her research for a year.
     
  • Charles Balch, professor of surgery, receives the Society of Surgical Oncology’s Heritage Award, one of the group’s highest honors. Balch is a former president of the 2,000-member organization and founding editor in chief of the society’s journal, Annals of Surgical Oncology.
     
  • Eric B. Bass, associate professor of medicine and senior faculty research fellow in the Urban Health Institute, is the editor in chief of a new, peer-reviewed journal, Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education and Action, published by the Johns Hopkins Press.
     
  • Allan Joel Belzberg, associate professor of neurosurgery, is one of only 10 physicians in the latest Who’s Who in Medicine and Health Care’s special section, “Healthcare Honorees: 10 Who Made a Difference.”
     
  • Bruce S. Bocher, professor and director of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is elected to the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and also elected to the Association of American Physicians.
     
  • Seth Blackshaw,  assistant professor of neuroscience, neurology and ophthalmology and assistant investigator, Center of High-Throughput Biology and the Institute of Cell Engineering, wins a Keck Foundation five-year grant for $1 million to study development of the retina.
     
  • Joseph Brady,  professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and former, long-time director of the Division of Behavioral Biology, which he founded, is recognized by the Association for Behavior Analysis for outstanding scientific contributions to the experimental analysis of behavior.
     
  • Jacquelyn Campbell, associate dean for faculty affairs and professor in the School of Nursing, is named the 2006 Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research. The award recognizes her leadership in researching intimate partner violence.
     
  • Marcia Canto, associate professor of medicine and oncology, receives a two-year grant of $500,000 from The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research. With matching funds from the National Cancer Institute, more than $1 million has been committed to her project to refine methods for detecting the disease in its early, curable stage before symptoms develop.
     
  • H. Ballentine Carter,  professor of urology, is elected to membership in the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons, one of the most distinguished urological societies in the world.
     
  • Richard Chaisson, professor of medicine, epidemiology and international health, and founding director of the Hopkins Center for Tuberculosis Research, receives the prestigious World Lung Health Award for scientific achievement from the American Thoracic Society.
     
  • Ying-Jun Cao, a postdoctoral fellow in the division of clinical pharmacology, is named the first recipient of the Young Investigator Award of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. The award includes a one-year, $35,000 grant to pursue an innovative use of existing therapies to prevent progression and transmission of HIV.
     
  • Curtis Chong, an M.D./Ph.D. candidate in pharmacology, is given a Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.
     
  • Curt Civin, professor of pediatric oncology and co-director of immunology and hematopoiesis in the Kimmel Cancer Center, receives the Return of the Child Award from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The award recognizes innovative research and patient care.
     
  • Donald Coffey, professor of pharmacology, molecular science and pathology, is appointed by President Bush to a six-year term on the National Cancer Advisory Board and receives an award from the Joy McCann Foundation for exceptional mentoring.
     
  • Ronald Cohn, a resident in the combined pediatrics and genetics program and chief resident at the McKusick-Nathans Institute for Genetic Medicine, becomes the first recipient of the Harvard-Partners Center for Genetics and Genomics Award in medical genetics. Cohn, whose research focuses on muscle regeneration in various muscle diseases, receives a $20,000 cash prize with the award.
     
  • Edward Cornwell, associate professor of surgery and head of adult trauma at the Hopkins Hospital, receives the Speaker’s Medallion from the Maryland House of Delegates. The medallion is awarded annually for exemplary service to the state by improving the quality of life for all Marylanders.
     
  •  Andrea Cox, assistant professor of medicine, receives a three-year, $300,000 grant from the Dana Foundation for her project, Mechanisms of Immunologic Unresponsiveness to Hepatitis C Virus Infection.
     
  • Staci Cummings, a Ph.D. candidate in pharmacology and molecular science, is the first recipient of the Joanna M. Nicolay Melanoma Foundation Research Scholar Award. She is focusing her current research on the role of certain proteins in melanoma development.
     
  • Nancy Davidson, professor of oncology and director of the breast cancer program in the Kimmel Cancer Center, becomes president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.
     
  • Ted Dawson, professor of neurogenerative diseases, and Valina Dawson,  professor of neurology, neuroscience and physiology, and co-directors of the Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering’s Program for Neuroregeneration and Repair (known as NeuroICE), are nominated to the Faculty of 1000 Biology in the section of neurobiology of disease and regeneration. The faculty is an online literature service that reviews noteworthy research papers published in the biological sciences. Ted Dawson also is named chairman of the scientific advisory board of the Bachmann-Strauss Dystonia and Parkinson Foundation.
     
  • Harry (Hal) Dietz, professor of pediatrics, is awarded the American Society of Human Genetics’ Curt Stern Award. It recognizes his outstanding scientific achievements in the genetics research he has conducted into Marfan syndrome.
     
  • Mark Donowitz, professor of medicine and director of the Hopkins Center for Epithelial Disorders, receives the American Physiological Association’s Davenport Award for career achievements.
     
  • Todd Dorman, associate professor of anesthesiology, surgery and medicine, associate dean and director of continuing medical education, and vice chair for critical care services in the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, is chosen president-elect of the American Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists for a two-year term.
     
  • Anthony Etzel, administrator of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, is picked as president-elect of the Association of Otolaryngology Administrators.
     
  • Frank J. Frassica, director and professor of orthopaedic surgery, receives the American Orthopaedic Association’s Smith & Nephew Endoscopy Distinguished Clinician Educator Award, as well as the 2006 Distinguished Southern Orthopaedist Award from the Southern Orthopaedic Association.
     
  • Joel Gallant, associate professor of medicine and assistant director of the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service, receives the Emerging Leader in HIV Clinical Education Award from the HIV Medical Association, a 2,700-member organization.
     
  • Li Gao, a research associate in the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’s genetics facility and genomics core, receives the Interest Section Award for 2006 from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The award provides $20,000 to fund her research for a year.
     
  • Richard George, a Reynolds Foundation postdoctoral fellow in cardiology research, receives the Melvin Judkins Young Clinical Investigator Award in Cardiovascular Radiology from the American Heart Association.
     
  • M. Chris Gibbons, associate director of the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, becomes president of the International Society for Urban Health. The 150-member organization of researchers, scholars and professionals study the health impact of urban environments and urbanization.
     
  • William Greenough, III, professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, is named to the inaugural class of Ambassadors in the Paul G. Rogers Society for Global Health Research. Names for a former Florida congressman, the society seeks to increase U.S. support for global health research.
     
  • William Guggino, professor of physiology and pediatrics, receives The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s 2006 Doris F. Tulcin Cystic Fibrosis Research Award, recognizing him as the country’s top cystic fibrosis scientist.
     
  • Samer Hattar, assistant professor of biology and neuroscience, receives a $625,000 Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. The fellowship will fund his scientific and engineering research.
     
  • Ellen Hess, associate professor of neurology and neurosciences, receives a $70,000 grant from the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation to fund her studies on how dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder, originates in the brain.
     
  • Ahmet Hoke, professor and director of the neuromuscular division in the Department of Neurology and Brain Sciences, receives a $100,000 grant from the Neuropathy Research Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to finding a cure for peripheral neuropathy, which can lead to paralysis and total sensation loss.
     
  • Ralph H. Hruban, professor and director of the Division of Gastrointestinal/Liver Pathology, is named the first science director of the Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Research. Hruban will help advance the Long Island-based foundation’s research while remaining at Hopkins.
     
  • Umbreen Idrees, clinical pharmacy specialist for the Department of Emergency Medicine, will serve as vice-chair of the American Society of Health System Pharmacists’ Section Advisory Group on Emergency Care.
     
  • Elizabeth Jaffee, professor of oncology and pathology and co-director of the Cancer Immunology Program and the Immunology and Hematopoiesis Division, receives the National Cancer Institute’s Outstanding SPORE Investigator award. It honors her pioneering work in pancreatic and breast cancer drug development conducted through the NCI’s Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE).
     
  • Kay Redfield Jamison, professor of psychiatry, receives an honorary Doctor of Medical Science degree from Brown University. The citation accompanying the degree notes that as an international authority and researcher, particularly on manic-depression, or bipolar disease, Jamison’s work has “gone far to demystify mental illness.”
     
  • Donald Jasinski, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Chemical Dependency at Hopkins Bayview, is selected to serve on the United Nations’ International Narcotics Control Board Advisory Panel of Experts. The INCB monitors implementation of the UN’s international drug control conventions.
     
  • Harpal Khanuja, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery, receives a John N. Insall Travelling Fellowship from The Knee Society. The fellowship sponsors visits to internationally recognized joint replacement and knee surgery centers.
     
  • Louise Knight, director of oncology patient and family services, receives the 2006 Leadership in Oncology Social Work Award from the Association of Oncology Social Work.
     
  • Sean Leng,  assistant professor of geriatrics, receives the Paul Beeson Career Development Award in Aging Research, one of the most prestigious in the field of geriatric research. The award includes an $800,000, five-year grant jointly funded by the National Institutes on Aging and private foundations.
     
  • Anirban Maitra, associate professor of pathology and oncology, receives the 2006 Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist Award from the Maryland Academy of Sciences, conferred by the Maryland Science Center. It seeks to encourage important work by young scientists and increase public awareness of their achievements. Maitra’s research has led to several potential new treatments for pancreatic cancer.
     
  • Eduardo Marbán, professor of medicine, cardiology, physiology, biomedical engineering and chief of the Division of Cardiology, is named the 2006 recipient of the Gill Heart Institute Award for Outstanding Contributions to Cardiovascular Research in recognition of his work in electrophysiology.
     
  • Jane Marks, associate director of the Johns Hopkins Geriatric Education Center, receives the National Gerontological Nursing Association’s 2006 Excellence in Gerontological Nursing Award.
     
  • Lee McCabe, associate professor of psychiatry and director of the Office of Behavioral Health, is elected president of the Academic Behavioral Health Consortium (ABHC), an incorporated national network of faculty representing academic departments. ABHC’s mission is to advance best practices in clinical, educational and care management programs related to mental health.  
     
  • Nancy McCall, archivist for the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and a research associate of the Institute of the History of Medicine, is named a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists, the highest honor bestowed by the organization.
     
  • Beth Murinson, assistant professor of neurology, receives a total of $210,000 in grants from the Mayday Fund and the Milbank Foundation for Rehabilitation to develop an educational program for medical students studying the treatment of pain.
     
  • Robin Newhouse, assistant professor in the School of Nursing and a Nurse Researcher in the Hopkins Hospital, receives a Mentored Scientist Award from Healthcare Research and Quality. The award will enable her to conduct research on nursing in rural hospitals, as well as take classes to enhance her expertise in health services research.
     
  • Hayat Nesheiwat, nurse manager for Hopkins Bayview’s orthopaedic outpatient department, is elected director of the executive board of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nursing.
     
  • Mary Newman, assistant professor of internal medicine, begins a four-year, elected term as governor of the Maryland chapter of the American College of Physicians, the national organization of internal medicine practitioners. The ACP is the largest medical-specialty organization and second-largest physician group in the U.S.
     
  • David Nichols, vice dean for education in the School of Medicine and professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, receives the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Section on Critical Care (SOCC) Distinguished Career Award.
     
  • John Niparko, professor and director of the Division of Otology, Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery, is elected president of the American Otological Society and editor in chief of Otology & Neurotology.
     
  • Kathy Noll, trauma program manager for the adult trauma service in the Department of Surgery, is appointed to a three-year term as chair of the Maryland chapter of the Society for Trauma Nurses. She will be instrumental in shaping the future of trauma nursing education, research, injury prevention and legislation in Maryland.
     
  • Shantanu Nundy, a second-year medical student, receives a Daisy and Paul Soros Fellowship for New Americans, one of the most sought-after awards for graduate study in the U.S. Soros Fellows receive up to a $20,000 stipend, plus half-tuition, for as many as two years of graduate study.
     
  • Arnall Patz, director emeritus of the Wilmer Eye Institute, is elected to the American Printing House for the Blind’s Hall of Fame for Leaders and Legends of the Blindness Field. He also receives the organization’s highest honor, the Wings of Freedom Award.
     
  • Trish Perl associate professor of medicine and director of hospital epidemiology and infection control, becomes president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology. The society, founded in 1980 to advance the application of the science of healthcare epidemiology, works to maintain the highest quality of patient care and healthcare worker safety.
     
  • Parag D. Parekh, a resident in the Wilmer Eye Institute, receives a 2006 Leadership Award from the American Medical Association Foundation in recognition of his non-clinical leadership skills in advocacy, community service and education.
     
  • Joanne Pollak, vice president and general counsel of the Johns Hopkins Health System and Johns Hopkins Medicine, receives the Distinguished Graduate Award from the University of Maryland School of Law.
     
  • Sarah Poynton, associate professor of comparative medicine, is appointed a regional acquaculture reviewer by the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization.
     
  • Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, assistant professor of neurological surgery and oncology, is among the first 13 honorees nationwide to receive a three-year, $150,000 Physician-Scientist Early Career Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Quiñones-Hinojosa also receives a $15,000 Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship  from the Association of American Medical Colleges, and is named to the Hispanic Scholarship Fund Alumni Hall of Fame.
     
  • Srinivasa N. Raja, professor of anesthesiology and director of the Division of Pain Medicine, is elected to a three-year term on the board of directors of the American Pain Society. She also is nominated to the Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Association for the Study of Pain.
     
  • Carmen Roberts, director of nutrition education and coordinator of Hopkins Bayview’s Dietetic Internship Program, is named Outstanding Dietitian of the Year by the Maryland Dietetic Association, the group’s highest honor on the state level.
     
  • Lisa Rowen, director of nursing, surgery, is named editor of Bariatric Nursing and Patient Care, the journal of the National Association of Bariatric Nurses.
     
  • David Rini, associate professor of art as applied to medicine, is named a Fulbright Scholar for 2006. He will spend seven months in Santiago, Chile, establishing South America’s first academic program in medical and scientific illustration at the Universidad de Andres Bello.
     
  • Richard Rubin, associate professor of medicine and pediatrics, is elected president of Health Care & Education for the American Diabetes Association.
     
  • Cynda Rushton, associate professor of nursing and program director of the Harriet Lane Compassionate Care Program, is among 20 nursing leaders nationwide to be selected as a 2006 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. She will receive foundation funding, matched by the School of Nursing, to develop a program of self-care and renewal for nurses.
     
  • D. William Schlott, associate professor of medicine, is elected to Mastership in the American College of Physicians.
     
  • Linda Shockney, registered nurse, instructor of surgery, administrative director of the Johns Hopkins Avon Foundation’s Breast Center, and a breast cancer survivor, is awarded the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s Professor of Survivorship Award. She is the first non-physician to receive the award, which is accompanied by a $20,000 gift to further efforts to help cancer survivors. She also receives the 2006 Patients of Courage: Triumph Over Adversity Award from the American Society for Plastic Surgeons.
     
  • Charles Silberstein, associate professor of orthopedic surgery, receives the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s Thomas Brady Award, recognizing his exceptional treatment of local athletes. He has been a team physician and orthopedic consultant for the Orioles, as well as an orthopedic consultant to the Hopkins athletic teams.
     
  • Paul Sponseller, professor and chief of pediatric orthopedics, receives the National Marfan Foundation’s Hero with a Heart Award for his quarter-century of treating the array of orthopedic problems suffered by children with Marfan syndrome.
     
  • Eden Stotsky, health educator in the Colon Cancer Center, receives the American Cancer Society’s Lane Adams Quality of Life Award, recognizing consistent excellence in care and counseling to cancer patients and their families.
     
  • Matthias Stuber, associate professor of radiology, radiological science and electrical engineering, is awarded first place in the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance’s best basic abstract competition.
     
  • Hongjun Song, assistant professor of neurology, receives a McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience Scholar Award, which includes $75,000 in research funding each year for the next three years. Song studies the ways 
    stem cells self-renew, in particular how adult nerve stem cells become nerves.
     
  • Deborah Trautman, director of nursing in the Department of Emergency Medicine, is appointed to the 14-member Baltimore City Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team. The group seeks to reduce domestic violence by reviewing cases of it and recommending initiatives to curb it.
     
  • Glenn Treisman, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, receives the William C. Menninger Memorial Award from the American College of Physicians for his contributions to medicine and psychiatry.
     
  • Patrick Walsh, professor of urology, is elected president of the prestigious American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons.
     
  • Gary Wand, professor of medicine and psychiatry and director of the Endocrine Training Program, is elected to The Association of American Physicians and admitted to The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.
     
  • Myron L. Weisfeldt, professor and director of the Department of Medicine,  receives the American College of Physicians’ John Phillips Memorial Award for Outstanding Work in Clinical Medicine.

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