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“A WOMAN’S JOURNEY” NEWS TIPS

Johns Hopkins Medicine
Media Relations and Public Affairs
MEDIA CONTACT: John Lazarou
410-502-8902; jlazaro1@jhmi.edu
October 23, 2006

“A WOMAN’S JOURNEY” NEWS TIPS

Following are summaries of seven selected presentations from among 32 prepared by Johns Hopkins faculty physicians for the 12th annual “A Woman’s Journey” (AWJ) symposium.  This year’s symposium will be held Saturday, Nov. 18, From 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna Street, Baltimore, MD.  To cover the symposium, set up interviews or for further details, call John M. Lazarou at 410-502-8902 or jlazaro1@jhmi.edu.

OPTIMIZING SEXUAL INTIMACY
Recent data suggest that, as the population ages, up to half of all women, and 30 percent of men, may suffer from disorders that compromise intimacy and sexual desire.  Are such disorders a normal part of aging?  Karen Boyle, M.D., assistant professor of urology and director of Reproductive Medicine and Surgery at the Johns Hopkins Brady Urological Institute, puts the statistics into context and describes evaluations and therapies for women approaching or past menopause, and their sexual partners.

HEART DISEASE….NOT JUST A BATTLE FOR MEN
Heart disease affects men and women in different ways, and “classic” symptoms are often missing or ignored in women.  According to the National Institutes of Health, heart disease is by far the leading cause of death among women, often striking in later decades than in men. Richard Lange, M.D., professor of cardiology and director of clinical cardiology at Johns Hopkins,
highlights the latest risk factors, early warning symptoms, research, preventive strategies and treatment options tailored for women.

CHOLESTEROL-LOWERING STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN
Roger Blumenthal, M.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the Ciccarone Preventive Cardiology Center at Johns Hopkins, presents evidence for the value of aggressively managed levels of LDL (“bad cholesterol”) and HDL in women and men.   He sorts out the “hype” from the “hope” surrounding hormone replacement therapy as a means of increasing HDL, and describes the best ways to monitor and control triglycerides, a form of fat found in the body that can be as harmful as LDL.

HEALTH DISPARITIES AMONG MINORITY WOMEN
Some diseases affect ethnic and racial minorities disproportionately, adding to the woes of those who may already have less access to preventive services and treatment. Lisa A. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of medicine and health policy and management at Johns Hopkins, discusses how race and ethnicity, patient-physician communication and physician bias affect the well-being of women of color and offers strategies to improve health outcomes.

MIGRAINES…A BIGGER PAIN FOR WOMEN THAN MEN
According to the National Headache Foundation, migraine headaches affect approximately 24 million women in the United States.  Moreover, experts say, the things that trigger and cause migraines are as varied as the women who get them. Jason Rosenberg, M.D., assistant professor of neurology and a headache specialist at Johns Hopkins, describes what’s common to all migraines and what’s not, along with the latest information about prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this under-treated and often misdiagnosed ailment.

WHEN COUNTING SHEEP JUST WON’T DO
An estimated 18 million Americans fail to get a good night’s sleep.  Alan Schwartz, M.D., associate professor of pulmonary medicine at Johns Hopkins and a sleep specialist, suggests lifestyle and behavioral approaches to better sleep, including ways to avoid sleep disturbances. He explains what “normal” sleep patterns are and are not, provides evidence for sleep differences between genders and parses the value of drugs and devices in maintaining good sleep habits.

DOES GROWING OLDER ALWAYS MEAN LOSING GROUND?
“Are my best days behind me?”  “Can I age gracefully?” These are questions most women (and men) ask themselves in their advancing years, and John Burton, M.D., professor of gerontology, one of the founding fathers of modern geriatrics and director of the Johns Hopkins Geriatric Education Center, has some answers.  Burton discusses the psychological, neurological and emotional changes that do and do not necessarily occur with increasing age and offers strategies for staying as young as you can as long as you can.

For additional information on the program, please call 410-955-8660 or visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/awomansjourney

 

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