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MOOD DISORDERS SYMPOSIUM WILL DISCUSS NEW FINDINGS IN RESEARCH AND TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR DISORDER.

Johns Hopkins Medicine
Media Relations and Public Affairs
Media Contact: Eric Vohr
410.955.8665; evohr1@jhmi.edu
April 11, 2006

MOOD DISORDERS SYMPOSIUM WILL DISCUSS NEW FINDINGS IN RESEARCH AND TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR DISORDER
-- Mary Wallace, wife of CBS television journalist Mike Wallace, will discuss his experience with depression

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will hold its 20th annual Mood Disorders Symposium on Tuesday, April 25, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., to draw attention to new findings in basic and clinical research on depression and bipolar disorders.

The symposium, to be held in the Thomas B. Turner Building, 720 Rutland Ave., at the Johns Hopkins medical campus, will feature remarks from Mary Wallace, wife of CBS’ 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace, who has spoken publicly about his long experience with depression and who personally addressed the symposium in 1992. Also speaking at the symposium is Leon E. Rosenberg, M.D., former dean of students at Yale Medical School. 

Intended for psychiatrists, social workers, psychologists and counselors, the event is also open to patients, family members and anyone who has an interest in learning more about depression and bipolar disorders. Registrants will participate in open discussions with researchers and clinicians from Johns Hopkins and other institutions.

“The goal this year is for those who come to leave with information about the onset, progress, genetics and treatment of mood disorders, and with tools for analyzing the personal and social dimensions of clinical depression and bipolar illness, including family strife, economic stress and loss of productive careers,” says J. Raymond DePaulo, M.D., professor and chair of psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and an authority on depressive illness. “We also offer best practices for professionals who interact with patients and their families and who work to help them cope and recover.

The symposium is jointly sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center.

The fee for the course is $95, and the registration cut-off date is April 18, 2006. There are no pre-course requirements.
Registration information is available at www.hopkinscme.net, or by telephone at 410-955-2959

The symposium itinerary is as follows:

• 11 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. Registration

• 12:50 p.m. to 1 p.m.  Welcome, conference goals, and introduction of symposium co-directors from The John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Karen L. Swartz, M.D., assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and director of clinical programs, Mood Disorders Center; and J. Raymond DePaulo Jr., M.D., Henry Phipps professor and director, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

• 1 p.m. to 1:25 p.m. Suicide Prevention: Can Research Teach Us What to Do? Paula Clayton, M.D., medical director, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

• 1:25 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.  Discussion

• 1:30 p.m. to 1:55 p.m.  Treatment-Resistant Depression: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go from Here? A. John Rush, M.D., professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

• 1:55 p.m. to 2 p.m. Discussion

• 2 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. No Teacher Left Behind: The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program Training Initiative. Karen L. Swartz

• 2:25 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Discussion

• 2:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Tea Time

• 3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Can Genetic Tests Help Us Achieve Better Outcomes after Antidepressant Treatment? Francis McMahon, M.D., chief, Genetic Basis of Mood and Anxiety Disorders Unit, National Institute of Mental Health

• 3:35 p.m. to 3:40 p.m. Discussion

• 3:40 p.m. to 4:05 p.m. A Family Member’s Perspective. Mary Wallace, wife of Mike Wallace from 60 Minutes, speaking about her husband’s depression

• 4:05 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. Discussion

• 4:10 p.m. to 4:35 p.m. Memoirs of Mood Disorders. Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

• 4:35 p.m. to 4:40 p.m. Discussion

• 4:40 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Refreshment Break

• 5:15 p.m. to 5:40 p.m. A Patient’s Perspective. Leon E. Rosenberg, M.D., professor, Department of Molecular Biology, and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

• 5:40 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. Discussion

• 5:45 p.m. to 6 p.m. Closing Remarks and Adjournment

Member of the news media who wish to cover the event may contact Eric Vohr at 410-955-8665, evohr1@jhmi.edu

 

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