Skip Navigation
News & Information Services
 
 
 
 
 
Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

“A WOMAN’S JOURNEY” NEWS TIP SHEET

"A WOMAN’S JOURNEY" NEWS TIP SHEET

Listed below are summaries of six selected presentations from 32 seminars to be presented by Johns Hopkins faculty physicians during the annual "A Woman’s Journey" symposium, to be held on Saturday, Nov. 12. To cover AWJ or develop stories related to the presentations, call John M. Lazarou at 410-502-8902 or jlazaro1@jhmi.edu.

DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS: LEG PAIN OR SWELLING--SIGNS OF A SILENT KILLER
It has rightly been called a silent epidemic. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which affects up to 2 million Americans per year, occurs when a blood clot forms in a large vein, usually in a leg. DVT can be deadly if the blood clot breaks loose, migrates to the lungs and blocks a pulmonary artery or one of its branches. Two years ago, former NBC journalist David Bloom died from DVT while on assignment in Iraq. Blood clots in deep veins may stem from long airplane trips, surgery and hormone replacement therapy. Jennifer Heller, M.D., a vascular surgeon, discusses risk factors, prevention and treatment for this common problem.

ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA: WHAT TO DO?
After 24 years of serving on our nation’s Supreme Court, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in July retired from the high court to spend more time with her husband, John, who has Alzheimer's disease. O'Connor's decision to retire capped a remarkable career that mirrored the changing role of women in American life and showed the increasing responsibility of women making family health care decisions. Geriatric psychiatrist Constantine Lyketsos, M.D., M.H.S, addresses diagnosis, research and treatment for this debilitating disease.

HOW HEALTHY IS OUR DRINKING WATER?
Tap, bottled water or fitness waters? Questions that thirsty, health-conscious people ask themselves when they want to quench their thirst. What chemicals does our tap water contain? What can you do to minimize toxins? Rolph Halden, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an environmental contamination expert, addresses these issues and how possible long-term exposure may cause certain health problems later in life.

MAKING AMERICAN DRUGS SAFER
Vioxx and Bextra are just some of the drugs pulled off the market in 2005. When the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), whose mission is making sure that drugs are safe and effective, takes such action, millions ask what "safe" really means. Clinical pharmacologist Craig Hendrix, M.D., explains why drugs may be withdrawn from the market after receiving FDA approval, what the approval process entails and whether off-label drugs and drugs imported from Canada are safe.

WOMEN EXCERCISING TO STAY WELL
Recent studies suggests that women may benefit from higher fitness levels, independent of changes in weight, blood pressure or cholesterol levels. Many health conditions affecting women, including heart disease, bone loss, diabetes and high blood pressure can be helped by regular exercise. Kerry Stewart, Ed.D, professor of medicine and director of clinical exercise physiology and heart health programs at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and its Heart Institute, discusses the benefits of exercise and fitness for improved well-being.

BREAST CANCER: WHAT’S NEW AND WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women in this country and will account for one out of three cases of cancer diagnoses in women in 2005. Nagi Khouri, M.D., radiologist and director of breast imaging at the Johns Hopkins Avon Breast Center, explains approaches to diagnosis, while Lisa Jacobs, M.D., surgical oncologist at the Center, describes new developments in treatment.

For additional information on the program, please call 410-955-8660 or visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/awomansjourney

WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 12, 2005, 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

WHERE: Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna Street, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Traveling for care?

blue suitcase

Whether crossing the country or the globe, we make it easy to access world-class care at Johns Hopkins.

U.S. 1-410-464-6713 (toll free)
International +1-410-614-6424

 

 
 
 
 
 

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer