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MAGNETIC RESONANCE COIL IMPROVES QUALITY OF MRI OF MALIGNANT LIVER OBSTRUCTION

Johns Hopkins Medicine
Office of Corporate Communications
MEDIA CONTACT: Gary Stephenson
410-955-5384; gstephenson@jhmi.edu
December 3, 2004

MAGNETIC RESONANCE COIL IMPROVES QUALITY OF MRI OF MALIGNANT LIVER OBSTRUCTION

Use of a receiver coil inserted into malignant biliary obstructions of the liver during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures enhances the image quality and may improve the diagnosis and staging of patients with liver obstructions, according to a study led by Aravind Arepally, M.D., assistant professor of radiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  The study, thought to be the first human trials of this new technology, allows high-resolution pictures of the liver and biliary tree not previously possible.

The procedure, called intrabiliary MRI (IBMR) was performed on eight patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Using fluoroscopic guidance, a magnetic resonance intravascular receiver coil (a miniature device that acts like a tiny version of the regular MRI scanner but is inserted into the area of interest in the body to amplify the MR signals to enhance the quality of the MR image) was inserted into a tube previously placed in the kidney as part of the treatment the patients had undergone earlier. Images were obtained before and 70 seconds after gadodiamide, a contrast agent was injected. Overall length of the MRI examinations ranged from 45 to 60 minutes and was well tolerated by the patients.  Image resolution was high, providing sharp contrast between the biliary lumen and adjacent structures.  The researchers conclude that their study demonstrates the clinical feasibility of augmenting regular MR imaging with receiver coils to improve diagnosis and staging of patients with biliary obstructions.

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THE FOLLOWING STUDY WAS PRESENTED AT THIS YEAR’S MEETING OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA (RSNA), FROM 11/28/04 TO 12/3/04 IN CHICAGO, ILL.



 

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