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"A WOMAN’S JOURNEY" NEWS TIP SHEET

Johns Hopkins Medicine
Office of Corporate Communications
Media Contact: John Lazarou
410-502-8902; jlazaro1@jhmi.edu
October 25, 2004

"A WOMAN’S JOURNEY" NEWS TIP SHEET

Listed below are selected subjects to be discussed by Johns Hopkins faculty physicians during the annual "A Woman’s Journey" symposium, to be held on Saturday, Nov. 20.  To cover AWJ or develop stories related to the topics, call John M. Lazarou at 410-502-8902 or jlazaro1@jhmi.edu.

BACK FROM THE BRINK
Recent statistics say that every 45 seconds, someone in America has a stroke.  About 700,000 Americans will suffer a stroke this year alone.  This disabling condition is our nation's number-three killer, with women accounting for about three of every five deaths.  Neurologist Argye Hillis, M.D., will discuss diagnosis and treatment options, risk factors and prevention strategies.

SILENT BUT DEADLY
Ovarian cancer has been called a "silent disease" because there are no specific symptoms.  However, a recent survey demonstrates that many patients actually DO have symptoms -- bloating, increased abdominal size and frequent urination.  Adding to the diagnostic problem, many women incorrectly assume that their annual Pap smear will accurately detect ovarian cancer.  A Pap smear is most sensitive for detecting disease of the uterine cervix.  Gynecologic oncologist Ginger Gardner, M.D., will separate the myths from the facts and provide information on the latest treatments for ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers.

SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION...A BATTLE FOR WOMEN, TOO
Inadequate sexual function in women is a complex problem with many causes.  Female impotence, sometimes called female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD), might be caused by physical illness, but often is linked to psychological factors.  According to the American Medical Association, female sexual dysfunction, more common after menopause, affects approximately 43 percent of women under the age of 60 in the United States.  Psychologist Leonard Derogatis, Ph.D., will clarify the latest research and innovative medications to treat conditions that limit sexual fulfillment in women.

SUDDEN DEATH BUT NO OVERTIME IN THIS GAME
About 400,000 people a year -- more than 930 Americans each day -- die of coronary heart disease without being hospitalized or admitted to an emergency room.  Most of these are sudden cardiac deaths, a headline-maker among professional athletes (Florence Joyner, Wilt Chamberlain).  Part of a Hopkins research program seeking to unravel the genetic contributors to sudden cardiac death, Director of Cardiology Eduardo Marban, M.D., will talk about the causes, including arrhythmia, tests and treatments.

LUNG CANCER:  A BREAK IN THE CLOUDS
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men AND women.  By the end of 2004, there will be about 174,000 new cases diagnosed and 160,000 deaths from this disease in the United States.  According to the American Cancer Society, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast and prostate cancers combined.  Lung cancer remains an epidemic, particularly for women.  Chief of Thoracic Surgery and Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program Stephen Yang, M.D., whose clinical interests focus on early detection of lung cancer, will explore risk factors, prevention, early detection and promising new treatments.

THE NOT-SO EXTREME MAKEOVER FOR YOUNGER WOMEN
MTV’s reality show "I Want a Famous Face," Fox’s show "The Swan" and ABC’s "Extreme Makeover" emphasize the altering powers of cosmetic surgery.  But, controversy has plagued these shows:  Do they truthfully and accurately portray the psychological and medical realities of aesthetic procedures?  Craig A. Vander Kolk, M.D., plastic surgeon and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Cosmetic Center, will be joined by his colleagues in showing makeovers that are typical of real-life -- not made-for TV -- cosmetic surgeries.  Vander Kolk and doctors from the Hopkins Cosmetic Center will provide before-and-after illustrations of cosmetic treatments ranging from body sculpting and breast enhancement to skin rejuvenation and non-surgical facelifts.  They will also suggest items to consider before "going under the knife."

HOW SAFE IS YOUR FOOD?
With the holiday shopping and travel seasons right around the corner, more people will be eating away from home at restaurants, fast food establishments and resorts.  To avoid food-borne illness, experts say caution is key.  Food-related diseases caused 76 million illnesses and 325,000 hospitalizations in the United States in 2003, according to the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Infectious disease specialist John Bartlett, M.D., will address food-borne infections and review ways to prevent and treat mad cow disease, "cruise ship diarrhea" and other food-related illnesses.

For additional information on the program, please call 410-955-8660 or visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/awomansjourney

WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 20, 2004, 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

WHERE: Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna Street
Baltimore, Maryland

 

 


 

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