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A Woman's Journey

“A WOMAN’S JOURNEY” NEWS TIP SHEET

Listed below are selected story ideas that focus on topics to be discussed by Johns Hopkins faculty physicians during “A Woman’s Journey” symposium on Saturday Nov. 8.  To pursue any of these stories prior to the event, call John M. Lazarou 410- 502-8902 or jlazaro1@jhmi.edu

EFFECTS OF THE ENVIRONMENT ON YOUR HEALTH
While the record number of rainy days experienced in the region last summer may have been great for mold, it has been less kind to humans.  Mold can have a severe effect on health especially among elderly women and stay-at-home mothers.  Environmentalist Lynn Goldman, M.D., can address how mold and other significant environmental threats, including air pollution, pesticides, chemicals in consumer products and endocrine disrupting chemicals, affect the health of a woman.

SHOP ‘TIL YOU DROP:  KEEPING YOUR BRAIN YOUNG
With Thanksgiving Day and the start of the holiday shopping season less than a month away, purchasing gifts for loved ones and friends will be at the top of everyone’s “to do” list.  We’ve all been told it is better to give than to receive, and now there is scientific evidence that this may really be true.  Neuropsychologist Marilyn S. Albert, Ph.D., and Guy M. McKhann, M.D., can explain how memory changes with age and how activities like shopping stimulate the brain to help “keep us young.”

PEACE OF MIND:  PREVENTING MEDICAL ERRORS
More Americans each year die from medical mistakes than from motor vehicle accidents or breast cancer.  As healthcare leaders from around the country continue to examine ways to improve patient safety in hospitals nationwide, families and patients can do their part to improve care and safety.  Health policy expert Richard O. Davis, Ph.D., can clarify how patients and families can reduce the risk of medical errors.

TREATMENT FOR FIBROIDS THAT CAN AVOID HYSTERECTOMY
An estimated 20 percent to 40 percent of women in the United States. 35 years or older experience non-cancerous uterine fibroids, while approximately 80 percent of African-American women have fibroids.  Currently, most fibroid symptoms are relieved by hysterectomy – the surgical removal of the uterus – or by myomectomy – the surgical removal of the fibroids.  However, both are inpatient procedures and require a six – to eight- week recovery time.  Kevin Kim, M.D., an interventional radiologist, will illustrate and discuss uterine fibroid embolization (UFE), an outpatient, uterus-saving procedure.  Recent studies support the conclusion that UFE and hysterectomy have similar rates of symptom control, with UFE having the added benefits of reduced hospitalization, lower complication rates, a much shorter recovery period and quicker return to normal activities.

WHEN INJURIES SPEAK:  THE ROLE OF FORENSICS
What do you get when you mix detective work, medical know-how and compassion?  The hot new field of forensic nursing!  Forensic clinical nurse Daniel Sheridan, R.N., Ph.D., has built a career studying the impact of violence on the human body, and he’s developed quite an eye for it. “Injuries talk to me,” he says. “Any good forensic nurse learns very quickly to interpret what injuries are telling them.”  Dr. Sheridan will discuss the emerging field of forensic healthcare and how it can help screen for violent trauma and abuse.  He warns, though, “There is absolutely nothing on CSI (referring to the popular CBS drama series) that will be discussed during this session.”

UNDERSTANDING AGING AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT
As “baby boomers” have transformed to the “sandwich generation,” more senior citizens and their families have found it difficult to co-exist under the same roof.  For both groups, life has changed dramatically.  Geriatrician Linda Fried, M.D., M.P.H., talks about the physical and health changes experienced with aging, as well as prevention strategies to maintain good health and promote independence.

For additional information on the program, please call 410-955-8660 or visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/awomansjourney
WHEN:      Saturday, November 8, 2003, 9:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
WHERE:     Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, 700 Aliceanna Street Baltimore, Maryland

 

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