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1996 Press Releases


Johns Hopkins Press Releases: 1996

DECEMBER
12/20/96 Reitz Named Senior VP for Operations at Johns Hopkins Hospital
Judy A. Reitz, Sc.D., who has held numerous clinical and administrative leadership positions at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center over the past 15 years, has been named Senior Vice President-Operations...
12/18/96 Peterson Named President of Hopkins Hospital
Ronald R. Peterson has been appointed as president of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, effective December 17, 1996....
12/16/96 Holiday Story Ideas
The holiday season can be a time of happiness -- but also health risks. Hopkins experts are available to discuss the following story ideas about common holiday ailments:...
12/12/96 Severity of AIDS Dementia Is Linked to Nitric Oxide Levels
Runaway production of nitric oxide (NO), a gas with effects as varied as nerve cell communication, control of blood vessel action and male erections, may contribute to AIDS dementia, according to Johns Hopkins researchers....
12/10/96 Hopkins to Open New Cardiac Care Unit
"This is what a cardiac unit looks like when it is designed by cardiac specialists." Patient-centered Unit Features Latest in Advanced Monitoring, Communications Equipment....
12/9/96 Scientists Make Gains in Treatment, Genetic Risks of Pancreatic Cancer
Johns Hopkins researchers have found that pancreatic cancer patients may live longer if they undergo chemotherapy and radiation after surgery, and that more people than previously thought may have an inherited risk for pancreatic cancer....
12/5/96 Endocrine Surgery Safer, Less Costly at Busier Centers
Parathyroid gland surgery is more successful and less expensive at academic medical centers with specialized endocrine facilities and experienced surgeons than at hospitals where fewer of the operations are done, a Johns Hopkins study suggests....
12/4/96 Survey Reveals Wide Variations in HMO Decisions on Coverage of New Medical Technologies
Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are generally less likely to cover expensive but effective new medical technologies than equally effective, but less expensive technologies, according to results of a national survey published in the Dec. 5 issue of The American Journal of Managed Care....
NOVEMBER
11/27/96 Hopkins Establishes Comprehensive Transplant Center
Kidney, Pancreas, Liver, Heart, Lung, Bone Marrow, Corneal Transplants Provided ....
11/25/96 Hopkins Receives $15 Million Gift for Basic Sciences
"Advances in these concepts are ultimately the foundations for future advances in medicine."....
11/25/96 Drug Developer Endows Basic Science Chair
A 1951 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (SOM) alumnus who was involved in two breakthroughs in glaucoma treatment has given Hopkins $2 million to create an endowed basic science professorship....
11/22/96 Researchers Close in on Source of Peanut Allergy
Johns Hopkins scientists searching for the culprits behind peanut allergy have shortened the suspect list from 30 peanut proteins to seven, an important step towards effective treatment of a stubborn and sometimes life-threatening allergy that may affect one in every 200 children and thousands of adults....
11/21/96 Hopkins, Maryland Community Health System Establish Managed Care Organization for MD Medicaid Patients
Eleven Neighborhood Health Centers Part of Priority Partners....
11/20/96 Kenneth P. Wilczek to Head Hopkins' Clinical Practice Ass.
Kenneth P. Wilczek, M.B.A., has been named executive director of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Clinical Practice Association (CPA), the physician group practice representing all the clinical departments and full-time faculty physicians of the School....
11/19/96 Location of Prostate Cancer Gene Found on Chromosome 1
A team of scientists from the Brady Urological Institute of Johns Hopkins, National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR) and Umea University in Sweden have identified the location of the first specific gene that predisposes men to develop prostate cancer....
11/19/96 First Comman Genetic Mutations Found in Sporadic ALS Patients
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified two genetic mutations that appear to cause or contribute to nearly half of all non-inherited cases of the deadly muscle disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's Disease....
11/19/96 Natural Estrogen Reduces Stroke Damage in Female Animals
Johns Hopkins scientists have shown that natural levels of estrogen offer females three times more protection against brain damage from strokes than their estrogen-lacking male counterparts....
11/19/96 Medical News Tips
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
11/18/96 Transgenic Mouse Offers New Clues to Alzheimer's Disease
Mice engineered with a human gene linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) produce more of the main ingredient of a substance called amyloid found in the brains of AD patients, according to Johns Hopkins researchers....
11/13/96 MRI May Improve Diagnosis, Treatment of Heart Attacks
A rapid nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test can measure heart cell damage from heart attacks in living animals, according to studies at Johns Hopkins and Northwestern University....
11/13/96 Atomic Force Microscope Probes Living Heart Cells
Heart cells' "skeletons" may help control their internal chemical activities, according to a Johns Hopkins study using a microscope that forms images by sliding a tiny needle over the surface of living cells....
11/12/96 Multi-Purpose Molecule May Help Reduce Heart Disease
Boosting production of one of the body's all-purpose molecules may fix a signaling problem in the heart's blood vessels that causes them to narrow instead of widen during physical stress, a Johns Hopkins study shows....
11/12/96 MRI May Identify those at High Risk for Heart Attacks, Strokes
Like tiny time bombs, unstable fatty deposits lurk within arteries until breaking off and blocking blood flow to the heart and brain. But a Johns Hopkins study shows that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may identify arterial deposits at high risk of rupturing....
11/12/96 Scientists Make Progress in Gene Therapy for Heart Disease
Johns Hopkins scientists have successfully used a virus to supply a missing gene and its enzyme product to muscle cells in animals and humans for an extended period. The achievement couldhaveimplications in the treatment of an inherited fatal heart disease in children called Pompe's disease....
11/8/96 Removable Filter Catches Deadly Blood Clots Red-Handed
A team of Johns Hopkins physicians placed a temporary metal filter inside a major vein to catch a life-threatening blood clot in a bedridden patient....
11/7/96 Men's Health Conference
Advances in detection, treatment and research of diseases affecting men's health will be discussed Nov. 11 at a one-day symposium sponsored by Johns Hopkins. The conference, at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel, begins at 8:15 a.m. and concludes at 4:30 p.m....
11/6/96 Hopkins Hires Stroke Director to Capitalize on New Stroke Treatments
Stroke expert Robert Wityk, M.D., becomes Johns Hopkins' new director of clinical stroke services on November 1. His goals include streamlining stroke care and expanding and advancing use ofclotbusters, chemical brain protectors and other new and experimental drugs for stroke victims....
11/5/96 Pet Scans Show Link Between Cocaine and Heroin Addictions
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Drug Abuse have the first direct evidence that the brain's own natural opiate system is deeply involved in cocaine addiction and craving....
11/1/96 Hopkins and the Girl Scouts Bring H.O.P.E. to East Baltimore Youth
Johns Hopkins and Girl Scouts have formed a unique partnership to provide opportunities for East Baltimore girls....
OCTOBER
10/30/96 Hopkins Medical Students Ban Together to Get Guns off the Streets
For the third consecutive year, Johns Hopkins medical students who are members of Physicians for Social Responsibility are making Baltimore streets and households safer by trading Teddy Bears for Guns, Saturday, Nov. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Johns Hopkins Security Post, 407 Caroline St. and Sinai Hospital, Hoffberger parking lot....
10/29/96 Johns Hopkins Becomes One of Few U.S. Hospitals Using New Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery
FDA Approves "Port-Access" Method ....
10/24/96 New Wilmer Pavilion Combines Medicine, Art and History
"The Wilmer pavilion unites state-of-the-art medicine, facility design and patient services, all done in a setting that preserves the best traditions of Wilmer Eye Institute."....
10/17/96 Johns Hopkins Selects New Gyn/ob Director
Harold E. Fox, M.D., has been appointed professor and director of gynecology/obstetrics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and chairman of gynecology/obstetrics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital....
10/14/96 Researchers Find Genetic Clues to Intestinal Disease
In a series of recently published studies, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that an intestinal disease affecting 400,000 people in the United States is actually a variety of related disorders that can be inherited and cause similar symptoms in close relatives....
10/10/96 Cholesterol Anchor Helps Signaling Proteins Direct Development
A quirky genius of the protein family has sprung another surprise on scientists, and its newest stunt has revealed that cholesterol, often villified for its role in heart disease, actually wears a white hat during the earliest stages of life....
10/9/96 Hopkins/Patient First to Develop Suburban Medical Network
Plan to Replicate Success at Green Spring Station....
10/4/96 Johns Hopkins, Howard County General Hospital Create County's First Cardiac Cath Center
Johns Hopkins Medicine and Howard County General Hospital will open the Central Maryland Heart Center Inc., an outpatient cardiac catheterization center, on the campus of Howard County General Hospital on Sept. 26. It will be the first such facility in Howard County....
10/1/96 Study Shows Major Savings in Supervising TB Care
"Health policies that seek only to save money in the short term ultimately may be both inferior to and more expensive than a more comprehensive approach..."
SEPTEMBER
9/24/96 Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene Study
Johns Hopkins scientists searching for genes that contribute to schizophrenia are conducting a new study of the Ashkenazi Jewish community. Although schizophrenia doesn't occur more often in this group, Ashkenazi Jews often marry within their faith. This may make it easier for scientists to track the flow of genes between generations....
9/19/96 Medical News Tips: September 1996
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
9/19/96 Some Kids May Go Home Soon after Sleep Apnea Surgery, Says Hopkins Study
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center concluded that not all children need to stay in an intensive care unit overnight after tonsil and adenoid surgery to relieve mild obstructive sleep apnea....
9/19/96 Men, as Well as Women, Benefit from Glass Ceiling Action in Academic Medicine
"We were seeing a large number of very talented scientists and physicians leave academic medicine. It was clear we were experiencing a brain drain."....
9/10/96 Scientists Make Progress Against Bone Diseases
An apparently harmless mutation in a gene that helps control the level of calcium in the blood eventually may be used to identify people with an increased risk of osteoporosis and other hormone-related bone diseases, a Johns Hopkins study suggests....
AUGUST
8/30/96 Low-Protein Diet May Reverse Kidney Disease
A very low protein diet with amino acid supplements may cure a severe kidney disease in some people, a Johns Hopkins study shows. The results suggest the dietary therapy should be tried before drug treatment for nephrotic syndrome, a chronic kidney disorder that often leads to kidney failure....
8/29/96 Back-to-School Tips
Here are two "back-to-school" topics from doctors at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center:...
8/27/96 Hopkins Researchers Find Genetic Alterations Linked to Cancer in Some Blood Samples: May Help Identify Patients with Advanced Cancer
Using a recently developed molecular test, investigators at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have detected genetic mutations specific to cancer in blood samples of six patients with head and neck cancer....
8/26/1996 Grants Fund Blindness Prevention Program
"This is an effective way to prevent blindness in many individuals with treatable disease."....
8/21/96 DNA Test Can Be So Sensitive It Fools Doctors
Scientists at Johns Hopkins say that a new urine test for chlamydia infection is so sensitive it can detect the genetic footprints of the germs that cause it up to two weeks after successful treatment with antibiotics....
8/21/96 Hopkins Establishes New Radiology Imaging Corporation: Johns Hopkins Imaging
Green Spring Station and Towson Selected as First Sites....
8/8/96 Pain: Just Think "No?"
The next time someone tells you that pain is all in your head, they could be at least partially right, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers....
8/7/96 Protein Glitch May Be Early Problem in Inherited Alzheimer's
Johns Hopkins scientists have assembled the first clues to the behavior of presenilin, a protein linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease....
JULY
7/26/96 Hopkins Researchers Develop Under-the-Skin Implant for Pain Treatment
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have developed the first under-the-skin narcotic drug implant for the treatment of pain in cancer patients....
7/23/96 Routine Screenings for Mild Thyroid Disorder Recommended
Like routine screenings for high blood pressure and breast cancer, screening for an underactive thyroid gland is cost-effective and should be part of periodic examinations for people over age 35, especially women, a Johns Hopkins-led study suggests....
7/11/96 Measles Virus: One less Mystery
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered an important way by which the measles virus weakens the immune system, leaving infected individuals in developing countries more vulnerable to deadly infections....
7/10/1996 Intelihealth Formed to Deliver Customized Health Care Information for Consumers
Two Giants in Field Launch Information and Products Marketing Company with Novel Business Strategy....
7/10/96 Intelihealth Creates Multimedia Home for Johns Hopkins Information
Company Will Customize Consumer Healthcare Content for Licensing Partners....
JUNE
6/27/96 Death of Olympic Figure Skater Linked to New Risk Factor
A newly discovered inherited risk factor for blood clots may have played an important role in fatally damaging the heart of Sergei Grinkov, the Olympic gold medalist figure skater from Russia who died last year at age 28, according to Johns Hopkins scientists....
6/24/96 Hopkins Nurse-Scientist Is President-Elect of American Heart Association
Martha N. Hill, Ph.D., R.N., a research director and associate professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, is president-elect of the American Heart Association (AHA)....
6/21/96 Hopkins Medical Business Courses Win National Honor
An executive medical-business graduate certificate program introduced at The Johns Hopkins University in 1994 to teach health care professionals the ins and outs of the medical marketplace was awarded first place in the 1996 National University Continuing Education Association's Innovative Program Awards Competition....
6/17/96 New Associate Director of Media Relations Named for Hopkins Office of Communications and Public Affairs
Gary M. Stephenson, M.S., has been named associate director of media relations for The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Office of Communications and Public Affairs....
6/13/96 Laser for Repairing Knees May Cause Unsuspected Damage
A surgical laser commonly used to repair knee joints may be a double-edge sword, repairing the knee in the short term but causing hidden damage to surrounding cells and worsening the injury in the long term, an animal study involving Johns Hopkins suggests....
6/13/96 Study Suggests Guidelines for Damaged Knee Ligament
A patient's physical activities and the extent of microscopic structural damage are key factors in deciding whether surgery is needed to repair a major ligament in the knee, a study involving Johns Hopkins suggests....
6/11/96 Testosterone May Affect Learning Skills; May Be Put in Tablet
Johns Hopkins scientists studying testosterone-replacement therapy report that the primary male sex hormone may affect some learning skills, including improving visual and perceptual abilities. The findings may provide additional insight into testosterone's role in the brain....
6/11/96 New Study Finds TV Medical Program Misrepresent CPR
Popular television shows such as "ER" inaccurately portray cardiopulmonary resuscitation and may contribute to public confusion and misinformed decisions about when to attempt life-saving treatments, according to results of a study to be published in the June 13 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine....
6/11/96 Race Plus Roaches: A Breathtaking Link
African-Americans are far more likely than Caucasians to develop asthma linked to cockroach sensitivity, according to research from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center....
6/10/96 Johns Hopkins Physician to Carry Olympic Torch
Although he will run only about a half-mile in the Olympic torch relay this summer, Johns Hopkins neurosurgery research fellow Chris Gibbons, M.D., is taking no chances....
6/5/96 Baltimore Couple Beats Odds to Have IVF Quadruplets at John Hopkins
While Michelle Jarrett is restricted to bed rest waiting to deliver quadruplets, her husband, Fred,has been in labor for weeks -- trying to finish a two-room nursery he is adding to the Baltimore couple's home....
6/4/96 Testosterone Dip May Predict Weight Loss with HIV Cases
Declining testosterone in HIV-positive men may be an early signal for the dangerous weight loss that occurs when AIDS develops, according to a Johns Hopkins study....
MAY
5/31/96 Inadequate Safety Features Put Commuter Air Passengers at High Risk for Fire Deaths in Crashes
Passengers in commuter airplanes and air taxis face a major risk of death or injury from fire in crashes because of inadequate fire protection equipment and uncrashworthy fuel systems, according to a Johns Hopkins study....
5/31/96 Pediatric Researcher Named to Top Post at Hopkins Children's Center
One of the nation's premier researchers into sickle cell disease and other blood disorders has been named director of the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and pediatrician-in-chief of the Hopkins Children's Center....
5/28/96 Key Feature of Self-Destructive Brain Disorder Revealed
"Patients with this disorder often spend most of their lives in restraints to prevent them from injuring themselves."
5/20/96 Representatives from 23 Nations Visit Hopkins to Discuss Global Medicine during 7th Annual Embassy Day
As many as forty ambassadors and attaches from 23 nations will come to the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions on Tuesday, May 21 to hear leading researchers and physicians discuss Hopkins' role in improving global health care....
5/19/96 Test Will Help Researchers Study New Tick-Borne Disease
Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a new test that may help probe potential links between Lyme disease and a recently discovered tick-borne illness, granulocytic ehrlichiosis....
5/15/96 Church-Based Programs Use Faith to Help Smokers Quit
A government-funded study suggests that physicians who want patients to quit smoking for good might do well to recruit local churches as health-care partners....
5/10/96 Peruvian Mummy to Undergo Imaging at Hopkins
A Johns Hopkins radiologist will use 20th-Century medical imaging technology to examine the remains of a 500-year-old Peruvian Incan mummy on Monday, May 13....
5/5/96 Harvesting Prostate Cells May Speed Cancer Treatment
A highly sensitive new technique for harvesting prostate cancer cells in blood may allow more rational use of anti-cancer drugs in advanced cases, say Johns Hopkins researchers who developed it....
5/3/96 15th Community Sports Clinic Sponsored by Johns HopkinsMed Students
Johns Hopkins first-year medical students are hosting the 15th annual sports clinic for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders from East Baltimore. The free clinics will be from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, May 4, 11, 18 and 25 at the Denton A. Cooley Athletic Center, 1621 McElderry St....
5/96 The Daybook
EVENTS....
5/24/96 While Waiting for New Heart, Patient Finds Love
Margie Moore's heart may be failing her physically, but emotionally it's overflowing with love. The 34-year-old data entry clerk from Middle River -- awaiting a heart transplant -- has decided now is the time to marry the love of her life....
APRIL
4/30/96 Shark Liver Substance May Slow Growth of Brain Tumors
Results of Johns Hopkins animal studies show that a natural shark substance nearly stops the growth of new blood vessels that nourish solid brain tumors....
4/25/96 Lt. Governor to Speak at Hopkins Volunteer Recognition Luncheon
Great health care requires more than caring professionals and top-notch facilities. An especially important resource for patients at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions has been its volunteers--who, in 1994 alone, gave over 100,000 hours of their time to others....
4/23/96 Self-Insured Employers Form Partnership with Hopkins for New Health Care Delivery Options
With more companies switching to self-insurance, The Johns Hopkins Health System is now sponsoring a new employer-controlled company, called Employee Health Plans (EHP), offering care management programs for employees enrolled in Hopkins' and other self-insured employers' plansacross the region....
4/22/96 Severest Asthma Patients Undereducated, Undertreated
A new Johns Hopkins study reaffirms that physicians and other medical staff are not giving severe inner-city asthma patients the treatment and the education necessary to prevent dangerous asthma episodes and costly visits to hospital emergency rooms....
4/20/96 Medical Institutions Sponsor Community Cleanup
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions' Department of Community Services and members of the Physicians for Social Responsibility at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine are sponsoring a Community Cleanup Day in historic East Baltimore from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 27....
4/19/96 Flu Vaccinations May Be Safe for HIV Patients
Johns Hopkins researchers have found tentative evidence that yearly flu shots are safe for HIV-positive patients....
4/19/96 Molecular Gatekeeper May Help Brain Create Memory
Calmodulin also could play role in nerve cell death....
4/17/96 Sitcom Star Discusses Personal Experience with Depression
Drew Carey, star of ABC's "The Drew Carey Show," discusses his personal struggles with depression at the 10th annual Mood Disorders Research and Education Symposium, sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Affective Disorders Unit and the Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA)....
4/10/96 Guidelines Suggested for Heart-Valve Infections with Brain Complications
A Johns Hopkins study establishes the first set of guidelines for diagnosing and treating people with heart-valve infections that cause strokes and other damage to the brain....
4/10/96 Healthy Eye Muscles Are Clue to Cause of Muscular Dystrophy
"If we could treat the limb muscles so they handle excess calcium the same way eye muscles do, we might be able to reduce the damage caused by muscular dystrophy."
4/10/96 Johns Hopkins Creating Specialty Networks with Community Physicians
Johns Hopkins Creating Specialty Networks With Community Physicians More than 200 cardiologists and 140 ophthalmologists in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Northern Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware and West Virginia have joined physician networks being developed by Johns Hopkins to partner with community physicians and deliver appropriate, cost-efficient care across the region....
4/9/96 1996 Young Investigators' Day Presentations
Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students honor some of Hopkins' best and brightest young researchers at the annual Young Investigators' Day Awards ceremony on at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 11....
4/4/96 Natural Substances May Fight Nerve Damage
A Johns Hopkins animal study suggests that a protective natural substance reduces pinched nerve damage and speeds recovery of the injured nerves. The finding may help to develop a treatment for sciatica and other common nerve injuries in people....
4/1/96 New Laser Technology for Treating Nearsightedness
As you may already know, the Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of the VISX excimer laser for the correction of mild to moderate nearsightedness in patients 18 years of age and older....
4/96 Medical News Tips: April 1996
Challenge: Saving Heart Without Brain Risk....
MARCH
3/20/96 Johns Hopkins to Host Conference on Medical Ethics
Johns Hopkins will host a conference on Ethical Dilemmas in Contemporary Surgery from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Saturday, march 23 in Tilghman Auditorium in the Ross Building at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Physicians and surgeons will present case studies for discussion by panelists and audience members....
3/20/96 Renovated Emergency Department to Open
Aiming to provide better, faster and less expensive care, Johns Hopkins will open its redesigned adult emergency department at 1 p.m., Tuesday, April 2. The new facility, which cost $1.25 million, has the same square footage but now has 28 treatment rooms (up from 22), a larger triage area anda new large treatment room for minor injuries and ailments....
3/19/96 National Resident Matching Program Day
The 120 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine seniors will learn at noon tomorrow in Turner Auditorium which residency program they will enter to continue their medical training....
3/11/96 Hopkins School of Medicine Ranked Number Two in Survey
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine received the second highest ranking in a survey of 125 research-oriented medical schools according to the seventh annual ranking of graduate schools published by U.S. News & World Report....
3/8/96 Blizzard Babies from Johns Hopkins IVF Lab Due in Fall
Like the birth of babies, the biological window of opportunity for in-vitro fertilization will not wait for a convenient time. January's record snowstorm halted much of the Baltimore area, but the Johns Hopkins In-vitro Fertilization Program had to deliver....
3/5/96 Marriage Is Biggest Risk Factor for HIV among Thai Women
"If the prostitute is HIV positive, the brothel is notified, but generally the women remain working untilthey develop symptoms."
3/4/96 Hopkins Takes over Medical Management of Heart Center
Hopkins Takes Over Medical Management of Heart Center ....
3/96 The Daybook
EVENTS...
3/96 Medical News Tips: march 1996
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of thesestories, contact person listed....
3/96 Press Reception for Launch of Johns Hopkins Listening Center
Johns Hopkins is launching the Listening Center, a comprehensive medical, technological and rehabilitative center for helping profoundly deaf children learn to hear and speak. The Center is believed to be the only one of its kind in the United States....
FEBRUARY
2/29/96 Exercise Test Predicts Onset of Heart Disease
Treadmill and thallium exercise tests, which measure blood flow to the heart during exertion, can predict the onset of heart disease several years in advance in people under age 60 with a close family history of premature heart disease, according to a Johns Hopkins study funded by theNational Institutes of Health....
2/22/96 Virtual Reality Helping to Treat Muscle and Skeletal Problems
Johns Hopkins scientists are using virtual reality technology to guide treatment from the operating room to rehabilitation exercises for a range of muscle and skeletal disorders....
2/21/96 Health Newsfeed, USA DN Radio Network Join Forces
The Health NewsFeed medical news program produced at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions is now available to 1,300 radio stations in the United States through a newly signed agreement with the USA Radio Network....
2/21/96 Allergy Shots Help Ragweed Asthma Sufferers
In carefully selected patients, allergy shots can safely and effectively ease the suffocating symptoms of ragweed asthma and, in some cases, may be even better than conventional asthma treatment, according to a new study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Mayo Clinic....
2/12/96 Hopkins Names Miller Interim Medical 4Dean
The Johns Hopkins University Board of Trustees today approved Edward D. Miller Jr., M.D., as interim dean of the School of Medicine and vice president for medicine, effective 3 1....
2/12/96 Substance That Turns Muscle to Bone Used for Dental Disease
In a small study of dental disease in baboons, Johns Hopkins and South African researchers have discovered that a substance that turns muscle into bone healed not only the jawbone but also repaired damaged connective tissue around teeth....
2/12/96 Overview of War on Aids to Be Discussed at AAAS Media Briefing
A decade of studies with drug-drenched polymer wafers has dramatically changed the outcomes of brain tumor patients. Using small, time-release wafers that deliver an anti-cancer drug directly to the brain, physicians at Johns Hopkins are extending lives and improving the quality of life for patients....
2/12/96 Recognizing and Altering Risk Factors May Help Doctors Reduce Occurrence of Alzheimer's
The best defense against Alzheimer's Disease may be to look for a variety of risk factors and change them in a way that minimizes a patient's chance of getting the disease, according to Claudia Kawas, M.D., an associate professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions....
2/7/96 Zerhouni Appointed Chairman of Hopkins Radiology
Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., has been named director of the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences by The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The Johns Hopkins Hospital....
2/96 Upscale Pavilion Renovations Take Hopkins Back to the Future
Johns Hopkins Hospital is set to open the Marburg Pavilion, an upscale unit where patients will receive the best medical care in the world in surroundings more reminiscent of a five-star hotel than a conventional hospital....
2/96 The Daybook
Hopkins Animal Labs Accredited. The American Association for the Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care has again fully accredited the animal care and use program at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions....
JANUARY
1/31/96 Organ Transplant Recipients Group Opens Local Chapter
The Transplant Recipients International Organization (TRIO) will celebrate the chartering of its newest chapter, the Greater Baltimore TRIO, at a reception at 6:30 p.m., February 27, at the Westview Lounge and Supper Club in Catonsville....
1/31/96 Eating Disorders National Awareness Week: February 5-11
The Johns Hopkins Hospital Eating & Weight Disorders Program, together with the Education for Health & Wellness Center, the Student Health Center and the Counseling and Student Development Center at Johns Hopkins University, will participate in the National Eating Disorders Screening Program during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week February 5 to 11, with the following....
1/18/96 Martha D'erasmo Named President, Ceo of Johns Hopkins Msc
Martha D'Erasmo has been named president and CEO of the Johns Hopkins Medical Services Corporation, effective January 1....
1/16/96 Dr. Martin Luther King's Daughter to Speak at Johns Hopkins
The Rev. Bernice King, daughter of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., will be the featured speaker at Johns Hopkins' annual King commemoration from noon to 1:30 p.mTuesday, Jan. 23 in Turner Auditorium....
1/16/96 Hopkins Scientists Find Another Gene Linked to Pancreatic Cancer
Johns Hopkins scientists have identified a gene involved in half of all cases of pancreatic cancer, the nation's fifth leading cancer killer....
1/5/96 Potassium May Lower Blood Pressure in African Americans
Potassium tablets may greatly reduce high blood pressure and its consequences in African-Americans who do not eat enough fresh fruit and vegetables and other potassium-rich foods, a Johns Hopkins study concludes....
1/96 Medical News Tips: January 1996
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....

 
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