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1995 Press Releases


Johns Hopkins Press Releases: 1995

DECEMBER
12/19/95 Care in Choosing Christmas Toys Can Save Eyes
Christmas decorations and toys meant to put a sparkle in a child's eye can cause it injury instead, warns a physician at Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute....
12/18/95 Holiday Party Unites Liver Transplant Recipients, Patients
Johns Hopkins' eighth annual Christmas party for liver transplant recipients and patients awaiting a liver transplant will be from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. tonight, Dec. 18, in the concourse of Hopkins' Turner Auditorium. About 200 guests are expected. The media are invited....
12/12/95 Holiday Story Ideas
Listed below are story ideas from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, contact the person listed....
12/4/95 Less Protein 5/Reduce Dialysis Deaths
Johns Hopkins scientists have found that a low-protein diet before dialysis 5/prolong the lives of kidney failure patients during the first two years on dialysis....
12/4/95 Volunteers Needed for Rheumatoid Arthritis Vaccine Study
Johns Hopkins is seeking volunteers to test the first drug intended to treat the cause of rheumatoid arthritis rather than the symptoms....
NOVEMBER
11/29/95 India Faces a Major Aids Burden by the End of the Decade
In the first study of its kind in India, researchers from Johns Hopkins and the National AIDS Research Institute in India have found evidence there of one of the highest rates of HIV transmission ever reported....
11/27/95 Scientists Track Molecular 'Terrorists' In Lupus
Like detectives tracking a terrorist, Johns Hopkins scientists have identified the cause of lupus flareups by figuring out its method of destruction....
11/27/95 Hopkins Testing New Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis
Johns Hopkins scientists and Targeted Genetics Corporation are set to begin a human safety trial of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis....
11/13/95 Scientists Gauge Heart Damage with Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Johns Hopkins scientists have developed a rapid nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test that can identify animal heart cells that have died after blood flow stops and restarts, a finding that 5/eventually speed up diagnosis and treatment of heart attacks in people....
11/13/95 Johns Hopkins Scientists Make Headway Against Heart Disease
Johns Hopkins scientists 5/have found the first inherited risk factor for the development of blood clots that cause heart attacks, especially in younger people. One in five Americans 5/have it....
11/13/95 Estrogen Receptor Gene Linked to Clogged Arteries
A Johns Hopkins study suggests that as some people age, their risk for coronary artery disease rises because a genetic change in their heart's blood vessels makes the vessels unable to benefit from estrogen....
11/13/95 Weight Loss Before AIDS Onset Predicts Reduced Survival
A Johns Hopkins study suggests that as some people age, their risk for coronary artery disease rises because a genetic change in their heart's blood vessels makes the vessels unable to benefit from estrogen....
11/13/95 Protein 5/be Critical Missing Link to Huntington's Disease
Johns Hopkins scientists have identified a potential direct protein link in the chain reaction that causes Huntington's disease, a link that 5/provide a target for novel drugs to treat the fatal disease....
11/8/95 Hopkins Researchers Explore New Ways to Treat Children's Reflux
Johns Hopkins Children's Center researchers speculate that food allergies -- those not detected with standard tests -- might be the cause of some gastrointestinal problems in children....
11/7/95 Weight Loss Before Aids Onset Predicts Reduced Survival
Researchers at Johns Hopkins are recruiting HIV-positive men for two studies of the possible beneficial effects of the male hormone testosterone on wasting--the loss of a significant amount of weight due to HIV infection....
11/2/95 Let Them Eat Yogurt?
Shortly after weaning, many children slowly lose at least some of their tolerance for lactose, the natural sugar in milk and other dairy foods. Some develop gas and diarrhea and parents 5/ban these foods to prevent trouble....
11/95 Medical News Tips
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
11/95 Scientists Discover a Genetic Basis for Aggressive Behavior in Male Mice
Johns Hopkins University scientists have discovered a genetic basis for violent and excessive sexual behavior in male mice....
OCTOBER
10/27/95 Scientists Find Blood Clots May Be Prevented In Lupus Patients
Johns Hopkins scientists studying the immune system may have discovered why some lupus patients who produce anti-clotting antibodies are still at a high risk for strokes and heart attacks during flare-ups of the disease....
10/27/95 Proposal Would Expand Use of CPR and Defibrillators
Under an upcoming congressional bill, many members of the general public would be required to learn to use basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and a device that delivers an electric shock to revive heart attack victims.
10/19/95 Nursing Focus of New Institute at Hopkins
In a move to share the expertise and educational programs of Johns Hopkins nursing with health care providers worldwide, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and The Johns Hopkins Hospital have formed The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing....
10/18/95 New Treatment for Eye Infections is More Convenient and Equally Effective
Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that a new antibiotic eyedrop treatment for a potentially blinding eye infection called bacterial ulcerative keratitis is easier to use and just as good as the standard therapy, which uses a mixture of two other antibiotics....
10/4/95 New Finding Establishes Genetic Tie Between Allergy and Asthma
"...We are clearly making headway in dissecting the complex genetic factors that can contribute to the development of asthma."
10/3/95 Laser Light"Tweezers": Where Magic Meets Physics
A Johns Hopkins biomedical engineer is levitating particles within living cells, pulling on a cell's membranes, and even playing tug-of-war with protein molecules--without ever touching them or freeing them from a sterile container under a microscope....
SEPTEMBER
9/28/95 Potential New Route to Treating Cystic Fibrosis Discovered
A new finding about the complex effects of cystic fibrosis 5/ultimately make it easier to treat the disorder, basic researchers at Johns Hopkins report....
9/26/95 CFS is Potentially Treatable, Says Hopkins Researchers
Results of a new Johns Hopkins study show that chronic fatigue syndrome is strongly linked to a common and potentially treatable abnormality of blood pressure regulation....
9/26/95 Medical News Tips
Using a community-based public health strategy called Directly Observed Therapy (DOT), Baltimore has produced the greatest decline in tuberculosis (TB) rates among major cities in the United States at a time when rates were increasing dramatically in other cities, according to a Johns Hopkins study....
9/22/95 New Form of Old Drug 5/Help Treat An AIDS-Relateddisease
A new drug to prevent a viral disease that strikes people with advanced AIDS is effective, but so toxic that it should not be used until doctors can determine a safe dose, according to a study headed by a Johns Hopkins researcher....
9/19/95 New Form of Old Drug 5/Help Treat an Aids-Related Disease
Listed below are story ideas from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
9/18/95 Home HIV Test is Found to be Reliable and Effective
Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that a home test kit for HIV infection that requires individuals to obtain a small sample of their own blood is accurate and reliable....
9/13/95 Quality of Care, Not Demographics, Determines Aids Survival
Access to good medical care is more important than sex, race, injection-drug use or socioeconomic status in determining how soon individuals infected with HIV will develop AIDS, and how long they will survive, according to a study by researchers at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions....
AUGUST
8/29/95 Needle-Sharing is Greater Disease Risk Factor Than Sex
Hepatitis B, a potentially fatal viral liver infection that spreads readily among the general population through unsafe sex, is more easily spread among intravenous drug users by sharing used needles, according to results of a study at The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health....
8/19/95 Orioles Announce Fund-Raiser with Goal of Donating $1,000,000 for 'Lou Gehrig's Disease' Research
The Baltimore Orioles have announced plans to establish the $1 million Cal Ripken/Lou Gehrig Fund for Neuromuscular Research at Johns Hopkins University....
8/19/95
Medical News Tips
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
8/18/95 Designers Galore, Fashions Soar at Hopkins' Best Dressed 'Store'
Designer dresses, vintage clothing, top-notch contemporaries and classic accessories will be put on the racks for the Johns Hopkins 1995 Best Dressed Sale and Boutique....
8/11/95 Street Drug Ectasy 5/Cause Lasting Brain Damage
The recreational drug Ecstasy, already suspected of causing brain damage, 5/do lasting harm by causing key nerve cells in the brain to grow back abnormally, according to results of a Johns Hopkins animal study....
8/10/95 Hopkins Researchers Find Clue to Chronic Allergic Reactions
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified an immune system protein that is linked to severeallergic reactions....
8/10/95 Diagnosis of Marfan Syndrome at Earliest Stage of Development
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have devised a method that should allow the reliable diagnosis of Marfan syndrome at the eight-cell stage of fetal development....
8/9/95 Limited Adrenal Gland Surgery Saves Lives
Accurate diagnosis and conservative surgery for a rare adrenal tumor can save lives and adrenal function, according to a collaborative study led by Johns Hopkins....
8/1/95 Fever Viewed as Key to Hospitalizing Elderly
In older patients, fever alone often marks the need for hospitalization, even in the absence of any other abnormal signs, according to results of a Johns Hopkins study....
JULY
7/3/95 Routine Thyroid Surgical Guide is Inefficient and Costly
A test routinely performed during thyroid surgery to check growths for signs of cancer is largely useless, misleading, costly and prolongs the operation, according to Johns Hopkins researchers....
JUNE
6/19/95 Medical News Tips
Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call the contact person listed....
6/16/95 Long-Term Survival After Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Rises
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a group of factors that can accurately predict which patients survive long term after surgery for the most common type of pancreatic cancer....
6/6/95 Animal Studies Seek Ways to Help Elderly Recover From Surgical Trauma
Animal studies at Johns Hopkins suggest that as people age they gradually lose their tolerance to the trauma of surgery, but the study results also suggest there 5/be ways to maintain some of their ability to recover....
MAY
5/30/95 Minority Scientists Train This Summer At Hopkins
More minority undergraduate students will get a jump on research careers in the biomedical sciences with the expansion of a summer internship program at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine....
5/12/95 No Evidence That Ozone Hole Over Chile Caused Eye Disease
A Johns Hopkins study has dispelled earlier fears that a hole in Chile's protective ozone layer caused an increase in eye and skin diseases among humans and animals....
5/12/95 Unusual Structure Found In Brains of Schizophrenic Patients
"The pieces of the schizophrenia puzzle are starting to come together."
5/4/95 Simple Exam Can Identify Babies With Rare Brain/Eye Disease
Johns Hopkins eye doctors have discovered the common cause of dramatic damage to both the eyes and brains of babies born with a rare inherited disease called incontinentia pigmenti (IP)....
5/1/95 Baseball's Strike Hiatus 5/Mean More Pitching Injuries
Major league baseball pitchers may be at increased risk for shoulder and elbow injuries this spring because of playing time lost to the players strike, according to a Johns Hopkins researcher....
APRIL
4/27/95 Simple Antibody Test Identifies Prostate Cancers Cells
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and Matritech Inc. (Cambridge, Mass.) have developed an antibody that 5/offer a new non-surgical means of detecting and fighting prostate cancer, according to Alan Partin, M.D., Ph.D., a research fellow in the Department of Urology....
4/25/95 Mouth and Throat Cancer 5/Result From Aging
A cancer of the mouth and throat linked in middle-aged people to smoking, drinking or specific genetic mutations is more likely in the elderly to result from random genetic errors accumulated over a lifetime -- in plain language, aging itself -- according to results of a study at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions....
4/24/95 A "Wall Breaking" at Hopkins Emergency Department
Gabe Kelen, M.D., uses delicate medical instruments to repair damage to the human body, butTuesday he will swing a sledgehammer to smash brick and mortar in the cause of medical progress....
4/14/95 Weak Immune System Foils Prevention of Aids-Related Disease
A team led by scientists at The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health says it has discovered why drug treatments to prevent a common AIDS-related disease 5/often fail....
4/4/95 Medical News Tips
Listed below are hearing and balance story ideas from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. To pursue any of these stories, call John Welby or Beth Saverino at (410) 955-1078.....
MARCH
3/31/95 Speaker Discusses Electroconvulsive Treatment for Depression
Martha Manning had it all: a successful career as a psychologist, a loving husband, and a happy, healthy daughter. Still, she found herself wrestling with debilitating bouts of depression that led to thoughts of suicide....
3/29/95 Hopkins Researchers Identify Genetic Cause of Cancer Syndrome
Researchers in the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions departments of pathologyand oncology have identified the genetic cause of Turcot's Syndrome, a condition characterized by brain and colon tumors....
FEBRUARY
JANUARY

 
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