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Curriculum: Established Programs

ETHICAL & SOCIOCULTURAL IMPLICATIONS OF
GENETIC & REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

Course Number: 315.623
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Course Director: Gail Geller, Sc.D.

COURSE READINGS

Readings for this course include a collection of articles and book chapters. One set of readings is on reserve in Lilienfeld library (and must stay there). The other set can be circulated among the students and photocopied if desired.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Given the discussion-format of the class, students are required to have completed the reading assignments prior to the day they are listed on the syllabus. The grade will be based on class preparation and participation as follows:

  1. Students will choose the class/topic that they want to be responsible for leading, and the readings to summarize and present.1 Three days before each class, the presenter(s) will distribute to everyone (by e-mail) a 1-3 page commentary on their assigned readings for that day. This will take the form of a newspaper editorial column, summarizing the issue as stated in the readings, and taking a position. Preparation/submission of the editorial and facilitation of the discussion will constitute 60% of the student’s grade.


  2. On the day of class all the non-presenting students will submit a one paragraph (no more than one page) response to the presenter’s commentary. If there is more than one presenter, non-presenters can either synthesize both editorials or choose one. The responses will take the form of a “letter to the editor”. These “letters” and active participation in class discussions will constitute 40% of the student’s grade.

OPTIONAL: Students who feel so inspired (or who want to boost their grade) can submit a short paper (no more than 5 pages) at the end of the course. This paper can either explore a related topic that was not covered in class or expound in greater depth on a topic that was addressed.


1Each class will be led by anywhere from 1-3 students depending on the amount of assigned reading.


COURSE READINGS

March 26:
Overview of Course
April 2:
Ethical Theory as applied to Genetics & Reproduction
Mary Briody Mahawold, Genes, Women, Equality. New York: Oxford University Press,2000. Pp. 1-6, 13-27, 69-81.
Rosemary Tong, Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, in Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.(ed. Susan Wolf), NY: Oxford University Press, 1996, pp. 67-89.
Dan W. Brock, "The human genome project and human identity", in Genes and Human Self-Knowledge: Historical and Philosophical Reflections on Modern Genetics, RF Weir, SC Lawrence, E Fales (Eds.), University of Iowa Press, 1994, pp. 18-31.
April 9:
The Impact of Genetic Testing on Notions of Disease and Normalcy
Ruth Hubbard, "Predictive Genetics and the Construction of the Healthy Ill," in Profitable Promises: Essays on Women, Science and Health, Common Courage Press, Monroe, ME, 1995, pp. 31-53.
Adrienne Asch and Gail Geller, "Feminism, Bioethics & Genetics," in Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996, pp. 318-342.
Dorothy Wertz and John Fletcher, "A Critique of Some Feminist Challenges to Prenatal Diagnosis," Journal of Women's Health 2 (1993): 173-88.
Abby Lippman, “Worrying - and Worrying about - the Geneticization of Reproduction and Health,” in W Teays and L Purdy (Eds.), Bioethics, Justice and Health Care, Toronto: Wadsworth, 2001, pp. 635-642.
April 16:
The Impact of Assisted Reproductive Technology on Ideas about Women, Motherhood, Parenthood, Personhood and Kinship
David Wasserman and Robert Wachbroit, “Defining families: The impact of reproductive technology,” in Report from the Institute for Philosophy & Public Policy, 1993;13:3-8.
Guido de Wert. The post-menopause: Playground for reproductive technology? Some ethical reflections. In The Future of Human Reproduction: Ethics, Choice and Regulation. (John Harris & Soren Holm, eds.). Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998, pp. 221-237.
Mary Briody Mahawold, Genes, Women, Equality. New York: Oxford University Press,2000. pp 127-142.
Hilde Lindemann Nelson, “Dethroning Choice: Analogy, Personhood and the New Reproductive Technologies,” in W Teays and L Purdy (Eds.), Bioethics, Justice and Health Care, Toronto: Wadsworth, 2001, pp. 555-563.
April 23:
Pre-conception Gamete Selection and Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis
Mary Briody Mahawold, Genes, Women, Equality. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. pp 209-224.
Soren Holm. Ethical issues in pre-implantation diagnosis. In The Future of Human Reproduction: Ethics, Choice and Regulation. (John Harris & Soren Holm, eds.). Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998, pp. 176-190.
Linda Hasadsri. The multi-faceted implications of preimplantation genetic testing. Princeton J Bioethics. 1998;1:76-82.
April 30:
The Destiny of Genetic Material: Ovaries, Oocytes, Embryos and Stem Cells
Charles A. Erin, “Some comments on the ethics of consent to the use of ovarian tissue from aborted fetuses and dead women,” In The Future of Human Reproduction: Ethics, Choice and Regulation. (John Harris & Soren Holm, eds.). Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998, pp. 162-175.
Andrea L. Kalfoglou and Gail Geller. A follow-up study with oocyte donors exploring their experiences, knowledge, and attitudes about the use of their oocytes and the outcome of the donation. Fertil Steril 2000;74:660-667.
Gilbert Meilaender, “The Point of a Ban: How to think about stem cell research,” Hastings Center Report 2001;31:9-16.
Michael J. Meyer and Lawrence J. Nelson, “Respecting what we destroy: Reflections on human embryo research,” Hastings Center Report 2001;31:16-23.
Dorothy Nelkin and Lori Andrews, “Homo Economicus: Commercialization of Body Tissue in the Age of Biotechnology,” in W Teays and L Purdy (Eds.), Bioethics, Justice and Health Care, Toronto: Wadsworth, 2001, pp. 294-300.
Sheryl G. Stolberg, “Clinics Full of Frozen Embryos Offer a New Route to Adoption,” N.Y. Times, February 25, 2001.
May 7:
Communities, Cultures, Diversity and Genetics
Ilana Suez Mittman and Marian Gray Secundy. A National Dialogue on Genetics and Minority Issues. Community Genet 1998;1:190-200.
Dena S. Davis. Groups, communities and contested identities in genetic research. Hastings Center Report 2000:30:38-45.
Eric T. Juengst. Group identity and human diversity: Keeping biology straight from culture. Am J Hum Genet 1998;63:673-677.
Mary Briody Mahawold, Genes, Women, Equality. New York: Oxford University Press,2000. pp 105-125.
May 14:
Reproductive & Genetic Technologies: The Potential for Population-Wide Inequities
Max J. Mehlman and Jeffrey R. Botkin. Access to the Genome. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 1998. pp. 88-128.
Resnik DB. Of maize and men: Reproductive control and the threat to genetic diversity. J Med Philos. 2000;25:451-467.

Last Updated: 11/25/02

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