Ali Nabavizadeh

Site Map

E-Mail: ANABAVI1(at)jhmi.edu
Phone: 443-287-3904

1830 E. Monument St., Room 306
Baltimore, MD 21205 USA









  • Education:


  • PhD Advisor: David B. Weishampel
    Dissertation Title: Diversity, Functional Morphology, and Evolution of Jaw Mechanisms in Ornithischian Dinosaurs

    B.S., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, 2009

  • Research Focuses:
  • Dinosaur Functional Anatomy and Evolution
    Jaw Mechanics in Ornithischian Dinosaurs
    Musculoskeletal Evolution in Vertebrates
    Scientific Illustration

    My research focuses on the functional morphology and evolution of jaw mechanisms in the herbivorous ornithischian dinosaurs. I use the comparative method to examine variation both between and among subclades through osteological as well as inferred myological and arthrological aspects of craniomandibular complexes. I also apply vector and lever arm analyses to interpret convergences in orientation of jaw movements and relative bite force, respectively. These analyses are used to elucidate the effects of specific evolutionary novelties of the jaw on the mechanical advantage at occlusion. Outside of Dinosauria, I have also investigated the evolutionary implications of jaw structure in proboscideans and its impact on jaw mechanics and proboscis evolution.

  • Special Links:
  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship 2009

  • Curriculum Vitae:
  • Available upon REQUEST

  • Publications and Abstracts:
  • PUBLICATIONS:

    Nabavizadeh, A. In press. Hadrosauroid jaw mechanics and the functional significance of the predentary bone. In The Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium (D. Evans and D. Eberth, eds.), Indiana University Press, Bloomington.


    ABSTRACTS:

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2013. Jaw mechanics in ornithischian dinosaurs and the evolutionary relationship between morphology and bite force. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts Book: 182A-183A. (Platform Talk)

    Fairman, J., A. Nabavizadeh, and D. Weishampel. 2013. Early sauropodomorph jaw apparatus anatomy: a comparative study with iguanian lizards. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts Book: 124A. (Poster)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2013. How the elephant got its trunk: evolutionary implications from long and short jaws in proboscideans. Annual Meeting of the Society for Cenozoic Research (TerQua) Abstract Book. (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2012. Jaw mechanics over proboscidean evolution. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts Book: 148A. (Poster)

    Weishampel, D.B., C.E. Sartin, and A. Nabavizadeh. 2012. Hadrosaurids from the 'lost continent' of Appalachia. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts Book: 192A. (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2011. Thyreophoran Jaw Mechanics and the Functional Significance of the Predentary Bone. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts Book: 164A. (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2011. The Functional Significance of the Predentary Bone in Ornithopod Jaw Mechanisms. Hadrosaur Symposium Abstract Volume: 108-112. (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2010. New Functional Significance of the Predentary Bone in Hadrosauroid Mastication. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Program and Abstracts book:138A. (Poster)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2009. A Possible Key to the Success of Ornithischian Dinosaurs. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 112(1/2). (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. , L.D. Martin, and D.A. Burnham. 2008. Do defensive structures in Triceratops prove predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus? Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 111(1/2). (Platform Talk)

    Nabavizadeh, A. 2007. Preliminary observations of a Pentaceratops specimen. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 110(3/4). (Platform Talk)


  • Faculty Advisor:
  • David Weishampel

               
    BACK TO CURRENT STUDENTS
      Last Updated: 14 November 2013. Version 2.5. The images displayed in this site are copyright protected. Please contact us for permission to use or reproduce any of these images. This site is optimally viewed at 1024x768.